December 2002
Volume 43, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   December 2002
Quiescent Endothelium is a Determinant of Strain-Dependent Angiogenesis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • CK Chan
    Pathology
    University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine Los Angeles CA
  • C Chinn
    Doheny Eye Institute Los Angeles CA
  • C Spee
    Ophthalmology
    University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine Los Angeles CA
  • SJ Ryan
    Ophthalmology
    University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine Los Angeles CA
  • DR Hinton
    Pathology
    University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine Los Angeles CA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   C.K. Chan, None; C. Chinn, None; C. Spee, None; S.J. Ryan, None; D.R. Hinton, None. Grant Identification: NIH Grant EYO 1545, NIH Grant EYO 3040, Research to Prevent Blindness, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foun
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science December 2002, Vol.43, 1758. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      CK Chan, C Chinn, C Spee, SJ Ryan, DR Hinton; Quiescent Endothelium is a Determinant of Strain-Dependent Angiogenesis . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2002;43(13):1758.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Angiogenesis, the growth of new vessels from pre-existing ones, is multi-step event that can be triggered by a variety of cytokines and growth factors. However, once initiated, the extent of new vessel growth is for the most part highly unpredictable. Recent experiments have shown that angiogenic potential, the extent of angiogenesis elicited by a particular stimulus, correlates with specific genetic backgrounds using a mouse model of bFGF-induced corneal angiogenesis. Since new vessel growth has been found to be associated with genetic factors, quiescent endothelium, the resting vasculature prior to any angiogenic stimulus, may also be modulated by similar factors. Methods: Using endothelial specific FITC-Griffonia simplicifolia lectin I -B4, corneal limbic vessel volume was determined for four inbred, weight- and age-matched mouse strains (c56BL/6, Balb/cJ, 129s3/Sv, and F1=c57BL/6 X 129s3/Sv) and quantified by 3-dimensional reconstruction confocal microscopy. Limbic vessel density was determined by summing the number of primary and secondary vessel branch points in 3 random fields of view. Results: Quiescent limbic vessel volume in 129s3/Sv, F1, and Balb/cJ strains resulted in over 8, 4, and 2 fold increases compared to c57BL/6 respectively (p<0.05). Limbic vessel density also resulted in a similar strain-dependent trend: c57BL/6 < Balb/cJ, F1 < 129s3/Sv; (p<0.05). This strain-dependent trend in quiescent vascular volume and vascular density parallels trends previously reported (and reproduced in our laboratory) for bFGF-induced corneal angiogenesis. Conclusion: This data suggests that genetic factors determining quiescent vascularity established during vasculogenesis may in part dictate adult angiogenesis. Subsequently, quiescent endothelium may determine the severity of angiogenesis-dependent diseases. Furthermore, elucidation and modulation of genetic factors influencing the quiescent vasculature may provide effective therapy toward angiogenesis-dependent diseases.

Keywords: 483 neovascularization • 371 cornea: endothelium • 316 animal model 
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