December 2002
Volume 43, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   December 2002
Difference in FDT Outcome in a Normal Hemifield between Early-Stage Open Angle Glaucoma Eyes with Elevated and Normal Intraocular Pressure
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • H Matsuo
    Department of Ophthalmology University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine Tokyo Japan
  • G Tomita
    Department of Ophthalmology University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine Tokyo Japan
  • Y Suzuki
    Department of Ophthalmology University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine Tokyo Japan
  • S Kunimatsu
    Department of Ophthalmology University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine Tokyo Japan
  • M Araie
    Department of Ophthalmology University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine Tokyo Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   H. Matsuo, None; G. Tomita, None; Y. Suzuki, None; S. Kunimatsu, None; M. Araie, None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science December 2002, Vol.43, 2175. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      H Matsuo, G Tomita, Y Suzuki, S Kunimatsu, M Araie; Difference in FDT Outcome in a Normal Hemifield between Early-Stage Open Angle Glaucoma Eyes with Elevated and Normal Intraocular Pressure . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2002;43(13):2175.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: Frequency-doubling technology (FDT) can reportedly diagnose early glaucomatous changes through detecting damage in magnocellular projecting retinal ganglion cells (M cells), which are more liable to pressure-induced damage. In eyes with open-angle glaucoma(OAG) with visual field defects confined to either lower or upper hemifield, early glaucomatous damage is also likely in the half optic disc corresponding to the spared hemifield. This study aims to study difference in M cell damage between OAG with elevated pressure (primary open angle glaucoma:POAG) and that with normal pressure(normal tension glaucoma:NTG) by FDT outcomes obtained from the spared hemifield. Method: Fifty-eight eyes of 58 early-stage OAG patients with elevated pressure (POAG) patients and 68 eyes of 68 early-stage OAG patients with normal pressure (NTG) with visual field defects as detected by HFA 30-2 program confined to either lower or upper hemifield were included. In FDT testing, patients were first tested with C-20 screening program, then with N-30 threshold program in each regularly visit. Data of the second results obtained with N-30 program were used. FDT-measured thresholds of each test point and its averages (FDT hemifield mean) over the hemifield judged to be normal or abnormal by HFA were compared between the POAG and the NTG groups. Results: Age, refraction (spherical equivalent), and mean deviation (MD) measured by HFA showed no significant of inter-group difference (55.6 ± 10.2 vs 58.6 ± 9.3 years, -3.2 ± 2.8 vs -2.4 ± 3.4 D, and -3.9 ±3.2 vs -4.1 ± 3.3 dB, respectively), while the highest intraocular pressure(IOP) recorded was 24.9 ± 4.4 mmHg in the POAG and 17.6 ± 1.9 mmHg in the NTG group, (p<0.001;Wilcoxon rank sum test). Mean of TD values in either damaged or spared hemifield showed no significant inter-group difference. In the hemifield judged to be normal by HFA, FDT-measured thresholds at 8 of 9 points and FDT hemifield mean (27.5 ± 2.8 vs. 24.4 ± 3.2 dB; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the NTG than in the POAG group. In the abnormal hemifield, FDT-measured thresholds at all points and FDT hemifield mean showed no significant inter-group difference. Conclusion: The present result suggest difference in contribution of IOP-dependent damage between the two types of OAG and that FDT can sensitively detect IOP dependent damage, being more useful for early detection of glaucoma with elevated IOP.

Keywords: 624 visual fields • 444 intraocular pressure • 498 optic disc 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×