December 2002
Volume 43, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   December 2002
The Metabolic Status of Experimentally Detached Cat and Rabbit Retinas
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • TS Rex
    Neuroscience Research Institute University of California Santa Barbara Santa Barbara CA
  • SK Fisher
    Neuroscience Research Institute University of California Santa Barbara Santa Barbara CA
  • GP Lewis
    Neuroscience Research Institute University of California Santa Barbara Santa Barbara CA
  • C Starnes
    Eye Research Institute Oakland University Rochester MI
  • BS Winkler
    Eye Research Institute Oakland University Rochester MI
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   T.S. Rex, None; S.K. Fisher, None; G.P. Lewis, None; C. Starnes, None; B.S. Winkler, None. Grant Identification: Support: NIH Grant EY0888
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science December 2002, Vol.43, 4535. doi:
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      TS Rex, SK Fisher, GP Lewis, C Starnes, BS Winkler; The Metabolic Status of Experimentally Detached Cat and Rabbit Retinas . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2002;43(13):4535.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Abstract: : Purpose: To determine the impact of experimentally induced retinal detachment (RD) on the metabolic status of the vascular and avascular retina. Methods: The rabbit retina, which has a very limited intraretinal vasculature, was chosen because it should be ischemic after RD. The cat retina, which has an extensive intraretinal vasculature, was chosen because it is very similar to the human retina and is the primary model for RD studies. Immunocytochemical localization and Western blot analysis of the Na,K-ATPase were performed. Biochemical assays measuring lactate and ATP content, as well as Na,K-ATPase activity levels were performed on normal and detached cat and rabbit retinas. Results: Confocal microscopy with anti-Na,K-ATPase demonstrated localization to the inner segments of the photoreceptors, neural processes in the inner retina, and Müller cells. In the cat retina, Na,K-ATPase protein levels increased transiently, primarily in the inner retina, to about 800% of normal at 1 day of RD and then returned to normal at 7 days RD. In contrast, the activity level of the Na,K-ATPase decreased to 50% of normal at 7 days of RD. Lactate levels increased transiently and ATP levels increased to 300% of normal at 7 days RD. In the rabbit retina, ATP levels decreased to about 66% of normal at 6 hrs and 1day RD. There was no change in rabbit retina Na,K-ATPase activity levels at 6 hrs or 1 day RD as compared to normal retina. Conclusion: The cat retina produces some ATP after RD while consuming less (as determined by ATPase activity), resulting in an accumulation of ATP. In contrast, the rabbit retina may decrease ATP production without an equivalent decrease in consumption. These data suggest that these two species use different mechanisms in response to ischemic insult caused by detachment. These differences may relate to the vastly different retinal vasculature of the two species. Studies comparing these two species in the RD model system may help to define the contributions of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis on the survival of retinal neurons during an ischemic insult.

Keywords: 563 retinal detachment • 467 metabolism • 448 ischemia 
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