September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
The Role of Infrared and Autofluorescence Imaging in the Evaluation of Peripheral Degenerative Retinoschisis and Retinal Detachments.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica Gomez
    Ophthalmology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Paul Drayna
    Ophthalmology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Dara Koozekanani
    Ophthalmology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Erik J Van Kuijk
    Ophthalmology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Sandra Rocio Montezuma
    Ophthalmology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jessica Gomez, None; Paul Drayna, None; Dara Koozekanani, None; Erik Van Kuijk, None; Sandra Montezuma, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1025. doi:
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      Jessica Gomez, Paul Drayna, Dara Koozekanani, Erik J Van Kuijk, Sandra Rocio Montezuma; The Role of Infrared and Autofluorescence Imaging in the Evaluation of Peripheral Degenerative Retinoschisis and Retinal Detachments.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1025.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Purpose : The primary aim is to describe features of peripheral retinoschisis (RS) and retinal detachment (RD) on infrared (IR) and fundus autofluorescence (AF) imaging. Second, to compare patient images obtained using IR and AF technology to color fundus photography, in an effort to identify characteristics that may demonstrate the added utility of IR or AF in the identification and management of RS or RD. Our third aim is to identify features that could help predict progression of RS or RD pathology.

Methods : An observational study of 29 eyes with RS or RD that underwent fundus photography, optical coherence tomography (OCT), IR, and AF. Color fundus photography was performed using a Topcon Fundus Camera (50DX Model). IR and AF images were obtained using a Heidelberg Spectralis HRA + OCT with 102 and 55 degree non-contact lenses, respectively. OCT imaging was also obtained using the Heidelberg Spectralis HRA + OCT.

Results : On AF imaging, all 19 retinoschisis (RS) eyes & 9/10 retinal detachment (RD) eyes had demarcated hypo-autofluorescent areas. Additionally, 6/19 RS & 6/10 RD eyes had a hyper-autofluorescent (AF) leading edge. In some RS cases, OCT images corresponding to the transition zone of hypo-AF to the hyper-AF leading edge, showed low-lying areas of RS extension.
On IR imaging, 17/19 RS eyes & 10/10 RD eyes, areas appeared hyporeflective (dimmer). Furthermore, 16/19 RS & 5/10 RD eyes had more delineated vasculature on IR compared to AF. Breaks and holes were best visualized with IR compared to AF.

Conclusions : IR imaging allows for better discrimination of lesion borders, better image quality for assessment of breaks/holes and better delineation of retinal vasculature to assess for progression compared to fundus photos or AF. Presence of a hyper-autofluorescent leading edge on AF imaging may be an indicator for progression.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

Hypo-autofluorescent (AF) area of RS with a hyper-AF leading edge.

Hypo-autofluorescent (AF) area of RS with a hyper-AF leading edge.

 

IR image of an RD, depicting hypo-reflectance and increased vasculature.

IR image of an RD, depicting hypo-reflectance and increased vasculature.

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