September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Depth of Visual Field Loss Using Threshold Automated Perimetry Increases with Eccentricity in Glaucoma Subjects
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert Wanzek
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Eric Lee
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Trina Eden
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Andrew Turpin
    Computing and Information Systems, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Luke Chong
    Computing and Information Systems, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Michael Wall
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Robert Wanzek, None; Eric Lee, None; Trina Eden, None; Andrew Turpin, None; Luke Chong, None; Michael Wall, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  VA Merit Review Grant
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 3899. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Robert Wanzek, Eric Lee, Trina Eden, Andrew Turpin, Luke Chong, Michael Wall; Depth of Visual Field Loss Using Threshold Automated Perimetry Increases with Eccentricity in Glaucoma Subjects. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):3899.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The visual field outside 30 degrees has not been systematically explored using static automated perimetry. We performed a cross-sectional clinical study to characterize differences in the full visual field between glaucoma and control subjects.

Methods : We gave 11 early stage glaucoma patients (less than -4 dB mean deviation) ages 58-74 and 63 controls ages 18-78, 30-2 Size V and Peripheral Size V tests using the Octopus 900 perimeter running the OPI (Open Perimetry Interface) with code our lab has developed. We repeated the tests at a second visit completed within a month of the first. Test locations of similar distance from fixation were grouped into eccentricity zones, each with roughly the same number of test locations. Thresholds within a zone were averaged and a slope and intercept were calculated for each subject. We then calculated the average slope for both glaucoma subjects and controls and compared them using statistical tests.

Results : The graph shows the decrease in visual sensitivity with eccentricity. This effect is more pronounced in the glaucoma patients (orange symbols and line). Due to unequal variances, a rank-sum test was performed to test for differences in these slopes and a statistically significant (p < .001) difference in the slopes between glaucoma patients and controls was found.

Conclusions : While all subjects show sensitivity loss with eccentricity, our new finding is that glaucoma patients demonstrate a greater linear decrease in sensitivity with eccentricity.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

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