September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Potential Microbial Contamination of Ophthalmic Solutions Commonly Used in Ophthalmology Outpatient Settings.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nathan Harms
    Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha , Nebraska, United States
  • Yasir Jamal Sepah
    Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha , Nebraska, United States
  • Laura Creamer
    Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha , Nebraska, United States
  • Salman Sarwar
    Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha , Nebraska, United States
  • Mohamed Kamel Soliman
    Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha , Nebraska, United States
  • Mohammad Ali Sadiq
    Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha , Nebraska, United States
  • Aniruddha Agarwal
    Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha , Nebraska, United States
  • Angela Hewlett
    Department of Internal Medicine Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Diana V Do
    Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha , Nebraska, United States
  • James W Gigantelli
    Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha , Nebraska, United States
  • Quan Dong Nguyen
    Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha , Nebraska, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Nathan Harms, None; Yasir Sepah, None; Laura Creamer, None; Salman Sarwar, None; Mohamed Soliman, None; Mohammad Sadiq, None; Aniruddha Agarwal, None; Angela Hewlett, None; Diana Do, None; James Gigantelli, None; Quan Dong Nguyen, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5565. doi:
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      Nathan Harms, Yasir Jamal Sepah, Laura Creamer, Salman Sarwar, Mohamed Kamel Soliman, Mohammad Ali Sadiq, Aniruddha Agarwal, Angela Hewlett, Diana V Do, James W Gigantelli, Quan Dong Nguyen; Potential Microbial Contamination of Ophthalmic Solutions Commonly Used in Ophthalmology Outpatient Settings.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5565.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To determine the rate of microbial contamination of three commonly used eye drops following regular clinical use.

Methods : Bacterial cultures from 120 labeled bottles (stored at room temperature in clinics) of Fluorescein Sodium, Proparacaine, and Tropicamide were obtained at days 0, 28, 42, and 56 following regular clinical use by plating 100 μl volume onto chocolate agar and incubating at 37° C for 48 hours.

Results : Rates of bacterial contamination were found to be 1.66, 2.75, 0 and 0% at days 0, 28, 42 and 56, respectively.

Conclusions : Eye drops may be used safely for up to 56 days (potentially longer with additional testing) following regular clinical use without significant risk of microbial contamination, most likely secondary to self-sterilizing property (presence of preservatives) of the solutions.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

Figure 1. One hundred twenty bottles of Fluorescein Sodium (n=40), Proparacaine (n=40), and Tropicamide (n=40) placed into service within Truhlsen Eye Institute were cultured, with rates of bacterial contamination found to be 1.67 (n=2), 2.73 (n=3), 0, and 0% at days 0, 28, 42, and 56, respectively. Of the solutions with positive bacterial cultures (n=5), four were contaminated with coagulase negative staphylococci and the remaining one with alpha hemolytic streptococci, both considered to be normal ocular flora.

Figure 1. One hundred twenty bottles of Fluorescein Sodium (n=40), Proparacaine (n=40), and Tropicamide (n=40) placed into service within Truhlsen Eye Institute were cultured, with rates of bacterial contamination found to be 1.67 (n=2), 2.73 (n=3), 0, and 0% at days 0, 28, 42, and 56, respectively. Of the solutions with positive bacterial cultures (n=5), four were contaminated with coagulase negative staphylococci and the remaining one with alpha hemolytic streptococci, both considered to be normal ocular flora.

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