September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Non-invasive measurement of retinal blood flow using the XyCAM RITM retinal imaging system: early clinical results
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samantha Cunningham
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Abhishek Rege
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Karan Raje
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Sachin Kalarn
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Yusi Liu
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • M. Jason Brooke
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Osamah Saeedi
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Samantha Cunningham, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (E); Abhishek Rege, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (E), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (P), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (I); Karan Raje, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (I), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (E); Sachin Kalarn, None; Yusi Liu, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (E), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (I); M. Jason Brooke, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (I), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (P), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (E); Osamah Saeedi, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Maryland Industrial Partnerships (MIPS) Program
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5927. doi:
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      Samantha Cunningham, Abhishek Rege, Karan Raje, Sachin Kalarn, Yusi Liu, M. Jason Brooke, Osamah Saeedi; Non-invasive measurement of retinal blood flow using the XyCAM RITM retinal imaging system: early clinical results. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5927.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Quantification of retinal blood flow shows promise as an early biomarker for diverse ocular pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. We have developed a non-invasive retinal imaging device—the XyCAM RITM—that captures high-resolution fundus images and uses laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) to estimate retinal blood flow.

Methods : The right eye of 4 healthy individuals (58-59 years old, 2 male) received tropicamide for pupil dilation and was imaged using the investigational XyCAM RI in a clinical environment. Subjects’ heads were stabilized on a standard clinical chin rest and the XyCAM RI mounted on a slit lamp base for fine motion adjustment (Fig. 1A). Four imaging sessions were conducted on each subject, where each session comprised of an ophthalmologist focusing on a desired region of interest (ROI) in the subject’s retina, followed by rapid, automatic acquisition of 5 red-free fundus photographs (with green illumination) and 120 speckle images (using red laser illumination). For reference, color fundus photographs were also obtained using a Topcon TRC 50DX fundus camera.
At least 4 vessel ROIs were identified in each fundus photograph and retinal blood flow velocities (RBFV) were estimated within those ROIs using LSCI-based methods. For each subject, statistical analyses were completed using data from the session with the lowest variation in RBFV estimates.

Results : Among all 4 subjects combined, the analyzed ROIs had a mean RBFV of 92.03 ± 40.47. The intra-session coefficient of variation (CV) in RBFV measurements was found to be low across subjects [CV = 6.31% ± 2.40%]. The vessel-to-background contrast ratio and variability in the intensity profile of images were further found to be similar between subjects’ XyCAM-based fundus photographs and reference images [p’s > 0.30].

Conclusions : Preliminary results from our early feasibility clinical study validate the ability of the XyCAM RI to not only acquire fundus images with the same level of vessel-to-background contrast as color fundus photography but also complement this information with reliable functional blood flow information (Figs. 1B, 1C). Further investigation is needed to confirm these findings and demonstrate the feasibility of using the device for early diagnosis of ocular diseases.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

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