September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Dynamic imaging of accommodating intraocular lens shift using Optical Coherence Tomography during naturally induced accommodation.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Florence Cabot
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Anne Bates Leach Eye Hospital, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Yu-Cherng Chang
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Marco Ruggeri
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Siobhan Williams
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Carolina P De Freitas
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Sonia H Yoo
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Anne Bates Leach Eye Hospital, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Jean-Marie A Parel
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Brien Holden Eye Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Fabrice Manns
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Biomedical Optics and Laser Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Florence Cabot, None; Yu-Cherng Chang, None; Marco Ruggeri, None; Siobhan Williams, None; Carolina De Freitas, None; Sonia Yoo, None; Jean-Marie Parel, None; Fabrice Manns, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH R01EY14225, P30EY14801; Australian Government CRC Scheme (Vision CRC); Florida Lions Eye Bank; Research to Prevent Blindness; Drs. KR Olsen and ME Hildebrandt, Drs. Raksha Urs and Aaron Furtado; Henri and Flore Lesieur Foundation (JMP).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, No Pagination Specified. doi:
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      Florence Cabot, Yu-Cherng Chang, Marco Ruggeri, Siobhan Williams, Carolina P De Freitas, Sonia H Yoo, Jean-Marie A Parel, Fabrice Manns; Dynamic imaging of accommodating intraocular lens shift using Optical Coherence Tomography during naturally induced accommodation.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 201657(12):.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To assess the dynamic accommodative response of anterior segment structures and accommodating intraocular lenses (IOL) using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT).

Methods : Prospective study performed at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute after approval by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Four eyes of 3 patients implanted with an accommodative intraocular lens (Crystalens,Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY, USA) at least 6 months prior to the imaging session were included in the study after informed consent. The eyes were imaged with a custom-built combined transscleral OCT (wavelength = 1325nm) for imaging of the ciliary muscle and high resolution spectral domain OCT (wavelength =840 nm) for anterior segment and IOL imaging. Images were acquired in a non-accommodated state and during naturally-induced accommodation using a custom made system that provided accommodation /disaccommodation stimuli of 0, 2 and 4 diopters. Measurement of dynamic accommodative response of the IOL axial shift was assessed after semi-automated segmentation.

Results : Mean age of patients was 70.7+/-12.8 ranging from 56 to 85 years old. The mean axial lens shift in response to a 2D accommodation stimulus, calculated as the difference of measurements between the 10 last and 10 first OCT frames, was 26+/-18 microns, ranging from 4 microns to 47 microns. The complete dynamic axial shift of the 4 IOLs is displayed in the Figure: a minimal and very variable axial shift with no consistent trend in the direction of the shift was noticed after a 2D accommodation stimulus. A backward axial lens shift instead of the expected forward shift was recorded in 50% of the cases.

Conclusions : This study enabled the real-time visualization of the axial IOL shift during accommodation. The preliminary results demonstrated that the axial shift of the accommodating IOLs is minimal and cannot provide a good quality accommodative response after naturally induced accommodation.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

Dynamic axial shift of accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) in response to a 2D accommodation stimulus in 4 eyes. In the 2 first imaging sessions (IOL#1 and IOL#2), quality of the last 20 OCT scans was not good enough to provide accurate data (the patient blinked).

Dynamic axial shift of accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) in response to a 2D accommodation stimulus in 4 eyes. In the 2 first imaging sessions (IOL#1 and IOL#2), quality of the last 20 OCT scans was not good enough to provide accurate data (the patient blinked).

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