September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Clinical Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow using the XyCAM RITM Handheld Retinal Imager
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Abhishek Rege
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Samantha I Cunningham
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Yusi Liu
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Karan Raje
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Sachin Kalarn
    University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • M. Jason Brooke
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Osamah Saeedi
    Vasoptic Medical Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Abhishek Rege, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (E), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (P), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (I); Samantha Cunningham, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (E); Yusi Liu, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (E), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (I); Karan Raje, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (E), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (F); Sachin Kalarn, None; M. Jason Brooke, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (P), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (E), Vasoptic Medical Inc. (I); Osamah Saeedi, Vasoptic Medical Inc. (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Maryland Industrial Partnerships Program (MIPS)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5925. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Abhishek Rege, Samantha I Cunningham, Yusi Liu, Karan Raje, Sachin Kalarn, M. Jason Brooke, Osamah Saeedi; Clinical Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow using the XyCAM RITM Handheld Retinal Imager. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5925.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : The ability to non-invasively acquire quantitative morphological and blood flow measurements in a primary care setting has the potential to enable early and effective diagnoses of debilitating ophthalmic and systemic conditions. Our team has developed a handheld retinal imager—the XyCAM RITM—that can complement fundus images with retinal blood flow (RBF) measurements. Here, we present proof of concept results obtained from clinical investigation of the handheld use of the XyCAM RI.

Methods : The handheld XyCAM RI (weight < 1.05kg, length < 30cm) performs fundus photography in green illumination and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) using red laser illumination. During clinical investigation, an ophthalmologist used the handheld XyCAM RI to image the right eye of 4 healthy individuals (58-59 years old, 2 male) through a dilated pupil. No accessories were used for stabilization of the device or the subject’s head. Upon focusing on a retinal region of interest (ROI) that includes the optic nerve head, 5 fundus photographs and 120 speckle images were acquired in rapid succession. Since this use case is susceptible to motion artifact, 4 imaging sessions were conducted and the most reproducible image was considered for analysis. Reference images were obtained using a Topcon TRC 50DX fundus camera. At least 4 vessel ROIs were identified in each image and retinal blood flow velocities (RBFV) were estimated within those ROIs using LSCI-based methods.

Results : The vessel ROIs included in the analysis had a mean RBFV of 93.39 ± 39.479. Intra-session coefficient of variation (CV) was estimated across images generated from 8 sub-stacks of 15 speckle images each in the imaging session and aggregated for all subjects. CV for handheld RBFV estimates was low [7.37% ± 2.91] and comparable with a use case wherein both device and subject’s head are stabilized [p > 0.10]. Discriminability of vessels against background tissue (contrast ratio) in fundus photographs obtained using the handheld and fixed XyCAM RI was found to be similar to the reference images [p’s > 0.10].

Conclusions : The handheld XyCAM RI was able to reliably capture RBFV information from the retinas of all 4 subjects. While further development and continued clinical investigation is necessary, these early results suggest that handheld use of the XyCAM RI may be a feasible strategy and may lead to the realization of a valuable point-of-care tool.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×