September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Tracking pulsatile motion of trabecular meshwork(TM) and collector channel entrances (CCE) in vivo in human subjects with PhS-OCT
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shaozhen SONG
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Murray A Johnstone
    Department of Opthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Chen Xin
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Joanne C Wen
    Department of Opthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Tueng Shen
    Department of Opthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Ruikang K Wang
    Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
    Department of Opthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Shaozhen SONG, None; Murray Johnstone, None; Chen Xin, None; Joanne Wen, None; Tueng Shen, None; Ruikang Wang, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. (F), Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. (C), Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. (R), Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc. (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 4682. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Shaozhen SONG, Murray A Johnstone, Chen Xin, Joanne C Wen, Tueng Shen, Ruikang K Wang; Tracking pulsatile motion of trabecular meshwork(TM) and collector channel entrances (CCE) in vivo in human subjects with PhS-OCT. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):4682.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Tissue stiffness changes that alter aqueous outflow system (AOS) tissue motion have been implicated as factor in the IOP elevation in glaucoma. We report a technique for in vivo imaging & quantitation of AOS micro-scale motion in humans.

Methods : Human subjects (12), Mean age: (32.7±8.27), F/M: 7/5, Race: Asian (12). Both eyes of each subject imaged. Laboratory prototype spectral domain, phase-sensitive OCT (PhS-OCT) system; Scan rate: 400 frames per second. The imaging system provides high-resolution and high frame rate structural images and micro-motion videos with typical sensitivity of ~0.31 nm. A new algorithm removes background in vivo tissue motion and enhances detection of TM and CCE motion. A trigger synchronizes a digital pulsimeter with OCT images permitting synchronous analysis of the pulse and TM tissue motion. Displacement amplitudes of the TM and CCE are determined from the time sequence of PhS-OCT imaging data.

Results : In each of 12 subjects TM motion synchronous with the pulse was apparent in color-coded displacement videos. Some typical displacement images when TM reaches maximum amplitude are seen in Fig.1 (a). TM maximum displacement was 0.37±0.05 um. In some subjects, synchrony of the pulse with not only TM, but also CCE motion was apparent on displacement maps. Tissue motion recordings indicate TM and CCE motion are synchronous with the cardiac pulse but with phase delays (Fig.1 (b)); such delays may provide information about wave propagation through the tissues and additional algorithm to analyze phase relationships are under development.

Conclusions : Our prototype PhS-OCT system incorporates protocols and algorithms that permit in vivo observation of TM and CCE motion in human subjects. The premise that tissue motion is essential to regulation of IOP homeostasis has support from both laboratory and clinical studies. Studies also implicate increased tissue stiffness as a factor leading to IOP elevation in glaucoma. We demonstrate that PhS-OCT permits imaging and quantifying AOS motion. As OCT imaging technologies continue to advance, in vivo monitoring of pulse-dependent AOS tissue motion may become useful in diagnosis as well as medical and surgical decisions in glaucoma management.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×