September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Spatial extent of inputs to primate ganglion cells in natural viewing conditions
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nora Brackbill
    Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
  • Nishal Shah
    Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
  • Georges A Goetz
    Neurosurgery, Ophthalmology, and Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
  • Alexandra Tikidji-Hamburyan
    Neurosurgery, Ophthalmology, and Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
  • Colleen Rhoades
    Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
  • Alexander Sher
    Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, United States
  • Alan Litke
    Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California, United States
  • EJ Chichilnisky
    Neurosurgery, Ophthalmology, and Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Nora Brackbill, None; Nishal Shah, None; Georges Goetz, None; Alexandra Tikidji-Hamburyan, None; Colleen Rhoades, None; Alexander Sher, None; Alan Litke, None; EJ Chichilnisky, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NSF Grant DGE-114747, NSF IGERT Grant 0801700, Pew Charitable Trust Scholarship in the Biomedical Sciences (A.S.), and NEI Grant EY017992
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 3580. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Nora Brackbill, Nishal Shah, Georges A Goetz, Alexandra Tikidji-Hamburyan, Colleen Rhoades, Alexander Sher, Alan Litke, EJ Chichilnisky; Spatial extent of inputs to primate ganglion cells in natural viewing conditions. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):3580.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Responses of primate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to natural scenes are not well understood and are poorly predicted by models that contain a linear receptive field (RF) as the first step. Previous studies have shown that under certain conditions, RGCs in various species receive input from outside the classical RF. Here we test the spatial extent of primate RGC inputs in response to natural scenes.

Methods : Large-scale multielectrode recordings were performed in peripheral macaque retina ex vivo. ON and OFF parasol cells were identified, and their RFs were measured by reverse correlation with a white noise stimulus. Natural scenes were images from the van Hateren database, presented with jitter to simulate fixational eye movements. To test the spatial extent of parasol cell inputs, responses to natural images were compared with responses to images in which one part was replaced by the image mean (Fig.1). The RF centers of the cells were fitted with a Gaussian envelope, and distances from cells to the uniform region were normalized to the standard deviation (SD) of this envelope.

Results : Clear changes in responses were observed only when the RF significantly overlapped the uniform region (Fig. 2), specifically, if the border was within 4 SDs of the RF center (roughly the edge of the surround). However, RGCs in the uniform region showed modulated light responses, primarily at image transitions, up to 6 SDs from the border.

Conclusions : Parasol cells stimulated with natural scenes in the RF appear little affected by inputs from outside the RF. However, signals for events like image transitions may affect distant parasol cells not receiving stimulation in their RFs. Polyaxonal amacrine cells, which have long processes and show clear responses at image transitions, could produce such a signal.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

The two stimulus conditions, overlaid with the mosaic of OFF parasol RF centers for one recording. Recorded firing rates are shown for three cells: one covered by the natural image in both conditions (red), one near the border (green), and one in the uniform region (blue). Image transitions are shown in gray.

The two stimulus conditions, overlaid with the mosaic of OFF parasol RF centers for one recording. Recorded firing rates are shown for three cells: one covered by the natural image in both conditions (red), one near the border (green), and one in the uniform region (blue). Image transitions are shown in gray.

 

The mean squared error between the firing rate over time in the two conditions, normalized by the average rate, as a function of distance from the RF center to the border of the uniform region. Positive distances are above the border as shown in Fig. 1. The average measured RF profile is shown in gray, centered at 4 SDs.

The mean squared error between the firing rate over time in the two conditions, normalized by the average rate, as a function of distance from the RF center to the border of the uniform region. Positive distances are above the border as shown in Fig. 1. The average measured RF profile is shown in gray, centered at 4 SDs.

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