September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Comparison of the Handy Eye Chart™ to the Lea Symbols Chart in a Population of Deaf Children aged 7-18 years
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John Gorham
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Beau B Bruce
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
    Department of Epidemiology, Emory Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Amy Hutchinson
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   John Gorham, National Eye Institute (F), Research to Prevent Blindness (F), The Georgia Knights Templar Foundation (F); Beau Bruce, NIH (F), Research to Prevent Blindness (F); Amy Hutchinson, Applebox LLC (I), National Eye Institute (F), Research to Prevent Blindness (F), The Georgia Knights Templar Foundation (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  National Eye Institute Departmental Core grant EY006360, Unrestricted gift from Research to Prevent Blindness, Unrestricted gift from the Georgia Knights Templar Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1549. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      John Gorham, Beau B Bruce, Amy Hutchinson; Comparison of the Handy Eye Chart™ to the Lea Symbols Chart in a Population of Deaf Children aged 7-18 years. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1549.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : The evaluation of visual acuity among Deaf individuals can be difficult. The Handy Eye Chart™ is designed to assist in evaluating patients with non-standard communication styles. The aim of this research is to compare visual acuity outcomes with The Handy Eye Chart™ against the Lea Symbols Chart in a population of Deaf children and to compare testability and preference between the charts.

Methods : 24 participants were recruited at the Atlanta Area School for the Deaf. Visual Acuity was evaluated using The Handy Eye Chart™ and the Lea Symbols Chart. Patient preference and duration of testing were measured.

Results : The mean difference between the visual acuity as measured by each chart was – 0.02 logmar (95% CI: -0.06-0.03). Testing with the Handy Eye Chart™ was an average of 13.79 seconds faster than the Lea Symbols Chart (95% CI: 1.1-26.47; p=0.03). 71% of the participants preferred the Handy Eye Chart™ (95% CI: 49-87%; p=0.07).

Conclusions : The Handy Eye Chart™ is a fast, valid, and preferred tool for measuring visual acuity in Deaf children age 7-18 years. Additional research is needed to evaluate the utility of the Handy Eye Chart™ in younger children and Deaf adults.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

Handy Eye ChartTM (reduced size)

Handy Eye ChartTM (reduced size)

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×