September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Visual Performance with Night Vision Goggles following Wavefront-guided and wavefront-optimized refractive surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bruce Rivers
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
  • Rose Kristine Sia
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
    WRESP, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Denise S. Ryan
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
    WRESP, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Lamarr Peppers
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
    WRESP, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Jennifer B. Eaddy
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
    WRESP, Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Lorie Logan
    Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center, Fort Belvoir Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, United States
  • Richard D. Stutzman
    Ophthalmology, George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
  • Joseph Pasternak
    Ophthalmology, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Bruce Rivers, None; Rose Sia, None; Denise Ryan, None; Lamarr Peppers, None; Jennifer Eaddy, None; Lorie Logan, None; Richard Stutzman, None; Joseph Pasternak, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Funded by USAMRAA Award W81XWH-09-2-0018
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 4870. doi:
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      Bruce Rivers, Rose Kristine Sia, Denise S. Ryan, Lamarr Peppers, Jennifer B. Eaddy, Lorie Logan, Richard D. Stutzman, Joseph Pasternak; Visual Performance with Night Vision Goggles following Wavefront-guided and wavefront-optimized refractive surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):4870.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To assess visual performance with night vision goggles (NVG) among U.S. military servicemembers before and after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and LASIK.

Methods : A total of 52 active duty U.S. military servicemembers with myopia or myopic astigmatism electing to undergo PRK or LASIK were randomized to undergo either WFG (VISX CustomVue STAR S4 IR) or WFO treatment (Wavelight Allegretto Wave EyeQ excimer laser system). Best-corrected low contrast visual acuity (LCVA) of the aiming eye was assessed pre- and postoperatively using a 25% contrast chart viewed through a NVG filter. Firing performance with a NVG and aiming light was evaluated preoperatively with optical correction and postoperatively without correction. A M16-A4 rifle was fired on a modified range with a 25-meter distance standardized target. Visual performance was compared among groups using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Associations between postoperative firing scores and LCVA with NVG, residual refractive error and type of surgery were determined using a regression analysis.

Results : The study participants (mean age 30.0 ±6.7 years and refractive error -3.77 ±1.40 diopters) underwent one of the following procedures: WFG PRK (n=12), WFG LASIK (n=13), WFO PRK (n=13) or WFO LASIK (n=14). At 6 months postoperatively, there were no significant differences in the LCVA with NVG or in firing scores among the groups (Table 1). Postoperative firing scores were not significantly associated with postoperative LCVA, residual refractive error or the type of surgery received (R2=0.09, p=0.63).

Conclusions : Myopic correction with PRK or LASIK using either WFG or WFO treatment was safe and effective in terms of visual performance with NVG under low light conditions. Independent of the type of surgery, there was no significant loss of visual acuity or firing performance under a visually degraded condition.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

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