September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Oculus Rift® as a Head Tracking, Stereoscopic Head Mounted Display for Intra-Operative OCT in Ophthalmic Surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Liangbo Shen
    Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Brenton Keller
    Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Oscar Carrasco-Zevallos
    Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Christian Viehland
    Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Paramjit K. Bhullar
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Gar Waterman
    Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Anthony N Kuo
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Cynthia A Toth
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
    Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Joseph A. Izatt
    Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
    Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Liangbo Shen, None; Brenton Keller, None; Oscar Carrasco-Zevallos, None; Christian Viehland, None; Paramjit Bhullar, None; Gar Waterman, None; Anthony Kuo, Bioptigen (P); Cynthia Toth, Alcon (P), Bioptigen (F), Genentech (F); Joseph Izatt, Leica Microsystems (P), Leica Microsystems (R)
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH R01 EY023039
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1701. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Liangbo Shen, Brenton Keller, Oscar Carrasco-Zevallos, Christian Viehland, Paramjit K. Bhullar, Gar Waterman, Anthony N Kuo, Cynthia A Toth, Joseph A. Izatt; Oculus Rift® as a Head Tracking, Stereoscopic Head Mounted Display for Intra-Operative OCT in Ophthalmic Surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1701.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Purpose : To visualize acquired data in previously reported real-time volumetric ophthalmic intrasurgical OCT systems, surgeons must either look away from the surgical microscope to view an external computer monitor, or utilize an internal microscope heads-up display to view through eyepieces. A novel Stereo Head Mounted Display (SHMD) has the potential advantages of wide field of view (FOV) and head tracking ability. We present a novel prototype SHMD with head tracking for intrasurgical OCT and report initial results in mock ophthalmic surgery.

Methods : A custom microscope stereo camera interface was designed and prototyped (Fig. 1A and B). Beam splitters were placed in the infinity space of each stereo microscope optical channel to project each channel into dual high-resolution cameras. A commercially available SHMD, Oculus Rift®, was modified for reduced chromatic aberrations and programmed to display live stereo video streams from both the microscope camera interface and our real-time 4D (volumetric imaging + time) microscope-integrated OCT (4D MIOCT) system. The complete system performed real time acquisition, processing, and stereoscopic display of both microscope view and volumetric OCT video streams during mock surgery (Fig. 1C). The surgeon’s stereo viewpoint of the OCT volume data was intuitively controlled through head tracking in three orthogonal axes (Fig. 1D).

Results : The angular FOV of the SHMD for each user’s eye was measured as 105°diagonal, which is much larger than that of microscope eyepiece (45°). Stereo microscope video and 4D MIOCT B-scans and volumetric renders of a human donor cornea were acquired and displayed during a mock surgery trial via the SHMD (Fig. 2).

Conclusions : The SHMD with head tracking for live, dual display of stereoscopic microscope and intrasurgical OCT volume data was demonstrated with potential applications in OCT image-guided ophthalmic surgery.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

Fig. 1. (A) Schematic and (B) photograph (red box) of stereo camera interface mounted on a surgical microscope. (C) Photograph of the SHMD used in mock surgery. (D) Illustration of head motion control of the rendered stereo viewpoint of the live OCT volumetric data stream. Figure adapted from oculus.com.

Fig. 1. (A) Schematic and (B) photograph (red box) of stereo camera interface mounted on a surgical microscope. (C) Photograph of the SHMD used in mock surgery. (D) Illustration of head motion control of the rendered stereo viewpoint of the live OCT volumetric data stream. Figure adapted from oculus.com.

 

Fig. 2. Microscope view and 4D-MIOCT data displayed in the SHMD. (A, B) Images seen through the left/right oculars in human donor cornea mock surgery. The surgical needle is indicated with a red arrow.

Fig. 2. Microscope view and 4D-MIOCT data displayed in the SHMD. (A, B) Images seen through the left/right oculars in human donor cornea mock surgery. The surgical needle is indicated with a red arrow.

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