September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Hyperspectral Autofluorescence Characterization of Transition to Atrophy in Donor Eyes with Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yuehong Tong
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York University, New York, New York, United States
  • Tal Ben Ami
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York University, New York, New York, United States
  • Sungmin Hong
    Department of Computer Science & Engineering, New York University Tandon School Engineering, Brooklyn, New York, United States
  • Rainer Heintzmann
    Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena, Germany
    Institute of Physical Chemistry, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany
  • Guido Gerig
    Department of Computer Science & Engineering, New York University Tandon School Engineering, Brooklyn, New York, United States
  • Zsolt Ablonczy
    Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, United States
  • Christine A Curcio
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, Alabama, United States
  • Thomas Ach
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany
  • Theodore Smith
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York University, New York, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Yuehong Tong, None; Tal Ben Ami, None; Sungmin Hong, None; Rainer Heintzmann, None; Guido Gerig, None; Zsolt Ablonczy, None; Christine Curcio, None; Thomas Ach, None; Theodore Smith, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  R01 EY015520 (RTS), R01 EY021470 (RTS), Foundation Fighting Blindness Individual Investigator Research Award (RTS), Research to Prevent Blindness (RTS), NEI EY06109 (CC), 2014 von Sallmann Prize (CC), EyeSight Foundation of Alabama (CC), Research to Prevent Blindness (CC), DFG Ac265/1-1(TA), DFG Ac265/2-1 (TA), NIH EY-019065 (ZA) and Research to Prevent Blindness (ZA).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 54. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Yuehong Tong, Tal Ben Ami, Sungmin Hong, Rainer Heintzmann, Guido Gerig, Zsolt Ablonczy, Christine A Curcio, Thomas Ach, Theodore Smith; Hyperspectral Autofluorescence Characterization of Transition to Atrophy in Donor Eyes with Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):54.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Obtain spectral properties of transition zones between atrophy and intact retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in donor eyes with late AMD (geographic atrophy-GA and neovascularization-NV).

Methods : Hyperspectral AF images were acquired from 6 flatmounts of RPE/ Bruch’s membrane (BrM) (1 GA donor, 2 tissues; 3 NV donors (4 tissues)) at peak excitations λex = 436 and λex = 480 nm for emissions 420-700 nm, 10 nm intervals. A matrix factorization algorithm recovered fluorophore emission spectra and respective basis images.

Results : Basis spectra S1, S2 and S3 were recovered from lipofuscin/melanolipofuscin (LF/ML) in RPE (Fig 1), intact or not, and were similar in shape, peak emission wavelength, and tissue localization (Fig 2) to those reported for normal RPE/BrM (PMID 25574430). The spectrum S0 (seen in normal BrM) was weak. Spectrum SD, which is sensitive and specific for drusen and sub-RPE deposits (ARVO 2015: Program Number: 3956), localized to sub-RPE deposits (Fig 1), peaked near 500 nm at λex = 436 nm, and was more visible in atrophic areas than in areas with surviving RPE (Fig 2). S2 was weak in two CNV cases (not shown) and strong in other tissues. The S3 spectrum of ML was less intense in GA relative to LF spectra S1 and S2 (Fig 1), consistent with decreased melanin, but not in CNV tissues.

Conclusions : The spectral characteristics of normal RPE were largely preserved in the transition zones between healthy cells and atrophy in advanced AMD. Normal RPE constituents may persist even in areas with severe AMD damage, consistent with reports of numerous RPE derived cells in atrophic areas (PMID 25813989).

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

Figure 1. Basis spectra. 81-year-old male donor. GA transition zone. Emission spectra from excitation at λex= 436 nm (solid) and 480 nm (dashed) (green, blue, red) resemble spectra S1, S2 and S3 reported in normal RPE. The azure spectrum is SD a marker for drusen and sub-RPE deposits. S0 (BrM, gray) is weak.

Figure 1. Basis spectra. 81-year-old male donor. GA transition zone. Emission spectra from excitation at λex= 436 nm (solid) and 480 nm (dashed) (green, blue, red) resemble spectra S1, S2 and S3 reported in normal RPE. The azure spectrum is SD a marker for drusen and sub-RPE deposits. S0 (BrM, gray) is weak.

 

Figure 2. Composite AF and spectral basis images for fluorophores of Fig 1. Upper left, composite RGB image of total AF emission. The basis images of the LF/ML fluorophores S1, S2 and S3 show comparable intensity and relatively normal distributions in both disrupted and intact RPE. The spectrum SD localizes to sub-RPE deposits in the atrophic area (lower R). S0 (BrM) localizes to exposed BrM.

Figure 2. Composite AF and spectral basis images for fluorophores of Fig 1. Upper left, composite RGB image of total AF emission. The basis images of the LF/ML fluorophores S1, S2 and S3 show comparable intensity and relatively normal distributions in both disrupted and intact RPE. The spectrum SD localizes to sub-RPE deposits in the atrophic area (lower R). S0 (BrM) localizes to exposed BrM.

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