September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Evaluation of the biocompatibility of an in situ forming hydrogel vitreous substitute in vivo: a one month study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nathan Ravi
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
    Research, VA Health Care Systems, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Jessica Struckhoff
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Ying-Bo Shui
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Sruthi Santhanam
    Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Paul David Hamilton
    Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Nathan Ravi, None; Jessica Struckhoff, None; Ying-Bo Shui, None; Sruthi Santhanam, None; Paul Hamilton, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH EY021620, Core Grant P30EY02687 and Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 5824. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Nathan Ravi, Jessica Struckhoff, Ying-Bo Shui, Sruthi Santhanam, Paul David Hamilton; Evaluation of the biocompatibility of an in situ forming hydrogel vitreous substitute in vivo: a one month study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):5824.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Many vitreoretinal diseases necessitate removal and replacement of the vitreous. Current vitreous substitutes leave much room for improvement. We developed a two-component in situ forming hydrogel vitreous substitute to mimic the structure and function of the native vitreous. The components are thiolated gellan, an analogue of collagen, and thiolated poly(methacrylamide-methacrylate), an analogue of hyaluronic acid. We performed a one month in vivo study to test its biocompatibility in rabbit eyes.

Methods : Thirty-two Dutch-Belted rabbits were used. Two sets received formulations of the two-component hydrogel (n=11 each) and the third set received silicone oil (n=10). A modified two port partial pars-plana vitrectomy was performed on the right eye of each rabbit followed by the injection of one of the three materials. Our substitute forms an ionic gel as it cools from 42oC to physiological temperature and then forms covalent bonds through oxidation. Baseline examinations prior to surgery include slit lamp assessments (SLA), measurements of intraocular pressure (IOP) and electroretinography (ERG). After surgery, IOP and SLA were performed on day one, four and seven. At one month, ERG, IOP, SLA and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were performed. Eyes were enucleated, fixed and H&E stained for histology.

Results : SLA showed no evidence of inflammation in the anterior chamber at day 1, 4, 7 or 30 in any experimental group. IOP measurements remained in the normal range for all experimental groups and control (Figure C). Preliminary ERG findings displayed similar response between the experimental and control eyes. OCT analysis of the retinal layers showed no retinal detachment (Figure A). Histology revealed no significant inflammation caused by any of the experimental groups (Figure B). In addition, in two cases of a retinal hole occurring during surgery, the hydrogel was able to tamponade the retina and prevent any retinal detachment from developing.

Conclusions : This in situ forming hydrogel exhibits high in vivo biocompatibility after one month duration in the rabbit eye. The hydrogel maintains optical clarity and physiological IOP with no evidence of inflammation. Retinal layers remained intact and retinal activity appears normal.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

(A): OCT at one month exposure. (B): Histology from an eye receiving Formulation 1. (C) IOP measurements.

(A): OCT at one month exposure. (B): Histology from an eye receiving Formulation 1. (C) IOP measurements.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×