September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Seasonal Changes of 24-hour Intraocular Pressure Rhythm in Healthy Shanghai People
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jingyi Cheng
    Ophthalmology, Eye & ENT Hospital, Shanghai, China
    Key Laboratory of Myopia, Ministry of Health (Fudan University), Shanghai, China
  • Ming Xiao
    Ophthalmology, Bei Zhan Hospital, Shanghai, China
  • Xiangmei Kong
    Ophthalmology, Eye & ENT Hospital, Shanghai, China
    Key Laboratory of Myopia, Ministry of Health (Fudan University), Shanghai, China
  • Xinghuai Sun
    Ophthalmology, Eye & ENT Hospital, Shanghai, China
    Key Laboratory of Myopia, Ministry of Health (Fudan University), Shanghai, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jingyi Cheng, None; Ming Xiao, None; Xiangmei Kong, None; Xinghuai Sun, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 6441. doi:
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      Jingyi Cheng, Ming Xiao, Xiangmei Kong, Xinghuai Sun; Seasonal Changes of 24-hour Intraocular Pressure Rhythm in Healthy Shanghai People. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):6441.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To investigate and compare the 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP) rhythms in winter and summer in the healthy population of Shanghai, China.

Methods : Twenty-four-hour IOP measurements were taken for the eligible twenty-nine healthy volunteers (58 eyes)in winter and summer. The temperature, hours of sunlight (sunlight time) and circulatory parameters, including heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), were also noted.The 24-hour IOP curves and IOP parameters in winter and summer were obtained and compared. The magnitude of IOP changes from summer to winter was described.<embed height="0" id="xunlei_com_thunder_helper_plugin_d462f475-c18e-46be-bd10-327458d045bd" type="application/thunder_download_plugin" width="0" />

Results : Generally, IOP decreased progressively before noon, increased notably at night, and peaked at 12:00AM in winter and at 2:00AM in summer. The pattern of 24-hour IOP in winter and summer was significantly different (P = 0.002). The average IOPs from 4:00 PM to 8:00 AM, except for 6:00 AM, were significant higher in winter (P < 0.05). However, no differences were significant after adjustments for temperature and/or sunlight time. From summer to winter, the extent of IOP increase was mostly around 0-3 mmHg, and the IOPs increased more significantly in the nocturnal period than in the diurnal period (P = 0.05).

Conclusions : The 24-hour IOP rhythms were different in winter and summer, with higher IOP level in winter. Temperature and sunlight time, which are independent of heart rate and blood pressure, affected the 24-hour IOP rhythms in healthy people in Shanghai, China.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

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