September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Morphological diversity of ganglion cells in marmoset retina
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ulrike Grunert
    Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Ophthalmology, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Rania A Masri
    Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Ophthalmology, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Kumiko Percival
    Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Oregon, Oregon, United States
  • Amane Koizumi
    National Institute of Natural Sciences, Tokyo, Japan
  • Paul R Martin
    Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Ophthalmology, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ulrike Grunert, None; Rania Masri, None; Kumiko Percival, None; Amane Koizumi, None; Paul Martin, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NH&MRC Project grant 1042609; Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function; Grant number: CE140100007
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, No Pagination Specified. doi:
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      Ulrike Grunert, Rania A Masri, Kumiko Percival, Amane Koizumi, Paul R Martin; Morphological diversity of ganglion cells in marmoset retina. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 201657(12):.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : In primate retina around 20 morphological types have been distinguished based on the shape and size of their dendritic tree and their projection to higher brain areas (Rodieck and Watanabe, 1993, J. Comp. Neurol; Dacey, 2004, The Cognitive Neurosciences; Yamada et al. 2005, Vis. Neurosci.; Crook et al., 2008a,b, J. Neurosci.; Szmajda et al., 2008, J. Comp. Neurol.; Ivanova et al., 2010, IOVS; Moritoh et al., 2013, PlosOne). The exact proportions of the specific cell types, however, are not known. Here we characterized the ganglion cell types across the retina of the marmoset.

Methods : Quadrants of adult marmoset retinas were mounted ganglion cell side up onto filter paper and then transfected via particle-mediated transfer using expression plasmid for the postsynaptic density 95-green fluorescent protein (PSD95-GFP). The retinas were cultured in Ames’ medium in an incubator for 3 days, then fixed and processed with immunohistochemical markers. Labeled cells were classified based on eccentricity, dendritic field size and shape, and stratification depth in the inner plexiform layer.

Results : In total over 580 ganglion cells were identified in three retinas. In accordance with the classification of Dacey (2004) we distinguished inner and outer midget, inner and outer parasol, broad thorny; small bistratified; large bistratified; recursive bistratified, recursive monostratified, outer and inner narrow thorny; smooth monostratified; large sparse cells and inner and outer giant (melanopsin) ganglion cells. Broad thorny cells made up 44% of the widefield cell population. In addition, low numbers of cells resembling ganglion cell types projecting to the superior colliculus and pretectum were identified. In central retina midget ganglion cells made up at least 46%; parasol cells made up 20% and widefield cells 34%. In peripheral retina the proportion of midget and parasol cells decreased to 37% and 15%, respectively, whereas the proportion of widefield cells increased to 48%.

Conclusions : Particle mediated gene-transfer allows the identification of at least 15 types of ganglion cell in marmoset retina. The proportion of widefield ganglion cell types increases with distance from the fovea.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

Ganglion cell types in the macular region of the marmoset retina.

Ganglion cell types in the macular region of the marmoset retina.

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