September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Comparison of Retinal Image Sharpness and Visible Retinal Area Between Two Ultrawide Field (UWF) Cameras
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aditi Gupta
    Beetham Eye Institute, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Hala El-Rami
    Beetham Eye Institute, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Rasha Barham
    Beetham Eye Institute, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Alan Fleming
    OPTOS PLC, Dunfermline, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Jano Van Hemert
    OPTOS PLC, Dunfermline, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Jennifer K Sun
    Beetham Eye Institute, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Paolo Sandico Silva
    Beetham Eye Institute, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Lloyd P Aiello
    Beetham Eye Institute, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Aditi Gupta, None; Hala El-Rami, None; Rasha Barham, None; Alan Fleming, OPTOS PLC (E); Jano Van Hemert, OPTOS PLC (E); Jennifer Sun, None; Paolo Silva, None; Lloyd Aiello, Optos (R), Optos (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Optos plc, Massachusetts Lions Eye Research Fund
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1645. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Aditi Gupta, Hala El-Rami, Rasha Barham, Alan Fleming, Jano Van Hemert, Jennifer K Sun, Paolo Sandico Silva, Lloyd P Aiello; Comparison of Retinal Image Sharpness and Visible Retinal Area Between Two Ultrawide Field (UWF) Cameras. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1645.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To compare sharpness and visible retina area (VRA) on images taken with two different UWF imaging devices.

Methods : Twenty eyes of 10 healthy volunteers were evaluated with mean age 37.50±16.25 years (range 23-68), refractive error (spherical equivalent) -1.71±2.89 diopters (range -7.50 to +3.0) and axial length 24.09±1.24 mm (range 22.47-26.88). For each study eye, UWF imaging with the Optos California (which utilizes phase plate adjustment) and Optos 200Tx (which does not) were acquired using a standardized protocol at the same visit (Stereoscopic on-axis 200o and monoscopic nasal, temporal, superior and inferior steered 200o images). All images were stereographically projected and evaluated at a centralized reading center. For each eye, the visible retinal area (VRA) was manually outlined on each UWF image and quantitated using customized software (Optos, plc). Total VRA area was determined from combining the VRA of all images. The mean image sharpness (defined as mean absolute % change in brightness/pixel after low pass filtering) was evaluated using an automated method within the full VRA of each image and within the peripheral region of the VRA located anterior to a circle of 4.5 disc-diameter radius centered on the fovea.

Results : There was little difference in VRA between devices regardless of gaze direction other than for superior steered images where California provided a larger VRA (Table 1). Compared to on-axis imaging alone, eye steering enabled visualization of additional retinal area for both California (37.8%) and 200Tx (33.0%). For both devices regardless of gaze direction, mean sharpness of the full VRA was greater than that of the peripheral area. Sharpness results for on-axis imaging are shown in Table 2. Sharpness of the full VRA was 19.5% higher for California than 200Tx. The reduction in sharpness between the peripheral area and the entire VRA was not statistically different for California (-7.0%, P=0.26) but was -31.2% (P<0.0001) for 200Tx. Sharpness of the peripheral image area was 61.5% higher in California than 200Tx.

Conclusions : The Optos 200Tx and California image similar areas of the retina. However, the loss of sharpness in the image periphery is 4.4-fold less with California. The degree to which better peripheral image sharpness allows identification of individual retinal lesions without the need for image steering remains to be determined.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

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