September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Glasses for Microtia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauren Maloley
    University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
    Children's Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • James Hermsen
    University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
    Children's Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Donny Suh
    University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
    Children's Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Lauren Maloley, None; James Hermsen, None; Donny Suh, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 224. doi:
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      Lauren Maloley, James Hermsen, Donny Suh; Glasses for Microtia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):224.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Microtia is a congenital anomaly of the external ear ranging from mild structural malformations to complete absence called anotia. There are currently minimal choices of glasses available for children or adults with microtia/anotia. The aim of this work is to report a novel glasses design to be used by this patient population. We will describe two case reports to illustrate the current challenges these patients face and how these innovative glasses may offer a solution and improve their quality of life.

Methods : Two 2 mm diameter nylon monofilament cords are fastened to a frame assembly. One cord wraps around the occiput of the patient’s head in a transverse fashion and the other wraps over the top of the head in a coronal fashion. The transverse cord is attached to the rims of the glasses frame and is adjustable using a special fastener tube to allow the cord to slide through to accommodate various head circumference. The coronal cord is secured to the transverse cord using soldered brass connectors. This cord can be sized to any length to create a custom fit. Two children with bilateral microtia were fitted for these glasses. We followed these children over time to evaluate the success of the glasses.

Results : The glasses offered an acceptable solution for the two cases described. The children’s representatives reported a secure and comfortable fit while allowing the children to participate in their normal daily activities.

Conclusions : New microtia glasses are an acceptable option and meet the current challenges. These glasses may benefit additional patient populations such as patients with micro or macrocephaly and burn victims.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

 

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