September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Outcomes of Post-traumatic Glaucoma in Assault Injuries
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kelly Lee
    Institute of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark , New Jersey, United States
  • Christopher Seery
    Institute of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark , New Jersey, United States
  • Arkadiy Yadgarov
    Institute of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark , New Jersey, United States
  • Albert S Khouri
    Institute of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark , New Jersey, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Kelly Lee, None; Christopher Seery, None; Arkadiy Yadgarov, None; Albert Khouri, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 3054. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Kelly Lee, Christopher Seery, Arkadiy Yadgarov, Albert S Khouri; Outcomes of Post-traumatic Glaucoma in Assault Injuries. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):3054.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Traumatic ocular injuries can cause glaucoma, yet few studies have examined the outcomes in assault injuries. We performed a review to evaluate patient characteristics, prognostic factors, and outcomes in assault injuries resulting in glaucoma.

Methods : A retrospective review identified 200 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of traumatic glaucoma seen in 2009-2015 at University Hospital. Inclusion criteria were 1) patients intentionally harmed with malicious intent and 2) follow-up of at least one year. Exclusion criteria were trauma due to other causes (motor vehicle accident, falls, sports, other) and nonadherence to medications. Demographic and clinical data were recorded for: LogMAR visual acuity (VA), mechanism of injury, intraocular pressure (IOP), and number of glaucoma medications. Mechanism of injury was classified as blunt or penetrating. Overall success was an IOP of 6-21 at one year follow-up, further defined as absolute success (maintaining IOP with no medication) or qualified success (requiring medication). Failures were sustained pressures >21 or <6 in >3 visits, enucleation, or need for additional glaucoma surgery.

Results : Nineteen patients met criteria (18 males, 1 female; mean age 42.8 years). Mean follow-up time since the trauma was 63 months. Physical assault (n=14) was the most common cause of injury (Table 1). 68.4% of the injuries were blunt compared to 31.6% penetrating. 42.1% required glaucoma surgery, such as tube shunts (87.5%) or trabeculectomy (12.5%). Twelve patients (63%) were overall successes with a mean IOP of 13.67 (p<0.05) at the 12-month follow-up. Five (41.7%) patients were absolute successes, while 7 (58.3%) patients were qualified successes. Seven patients were failures (37%) with a mean IOP of 30.57, even with glaucoma surgery and/or medication (Table 2). As for prognostic factors, initial IOP was outside the normal range of 6-21 (odds ratio 1.87 95% CI: 0.28-12.31) and presenting mean VA was worse at 2.05 or hand movements (odds ratio 4.29 95% CI: 0.39-47.63) in the failure group.

Conclusions : Post-traumatic glaucoma due to assault can be severe with significant loss of vision. However 63.2% were successfully controlled with treatment, and of those 41.7% were surgical successes. Visual prognosis is guarded but control of glaucoma is possible with surgical and medical interventions.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

Table 1. Causes of assault injury

Table 1. Causes of assault injury

 

Table 2. Clinical results at baseline and 12 months from initial presentation

Table 2. Clinical results at baseline and 12 months from initial presentation

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×