September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Cholesterol Penetration into Daily Disposable Contact Lenses Using a Novel In Vitro Eye-Blink Model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hendrik Walther
    School of Optometry, CCLR, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • Chau-Minh Phan
    School of Optometry, CCLR, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • Lakshman N Subbaraman
    School of Optometry, CCLR, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • Lyndon William Jones
    School of Optometry, CCLR, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Hendrik Walther, None; Chau-Minh Phan, None; Lakshman Subbaraman, None; Lyndon Jones, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1476. doi:
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      Hendrik Walther, Chau-Minh Phan, Lakshman N Subbaraman, Lyndon William Jones; Cholesterol Penetration into Daily Disposable Contact Lenses Using a Novel In Vitro Eye-Blink Model. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1476.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Purpose : The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in lipid uptake and penetration in daily disposable (DD) contact lenses (CL) using the conventional “in-vial” method compared to a novel in vitro eye model.

Methods : The penetration of NBD-cholesterol (7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl-cholesterol) on three silicone hydrogel (SH) (delefilcon A, somofilcon A, narafilcon A) and 4 conventional hydrogel (CH) (etafilcon A, ocufilcon B, nesofilcon A, nelfilcon A) DD CLs were investigated. The CLs were incubated for 4 and 12 hrs in an artificial tear solution (ATS) containing fluorescently labeled NBD-cholesterol at room temperature (21oC). For the vial condition, the CLs were incubated in a vial containing 3.5 mL of ATS. In the in vitro eye model, the CLs were mounted on our eye-blink platform, designed to simulate physiological tear flow (2 mL/24 hrs), tear volume, and ‘simulated’ blinking. After the incubation period, the CLs were analyzed using a laser scanning confocal microscopy technique (LSCM). Quantitative analysis for penetration depth and relative fluorescence intensity values was determined using ImageJ.

Results : The depth of penetration of NBD-cholesterol varied between the vial and the eye-blink platform. Using the traditional vial incubation method, NBD-cholesterol uptake occurred equally on both sides of all lens materials. However, employing our eye-blink model, cholesterol penetration was observed primarily on the anterior surface of the CLs. In general, SH lenses showed higher intensities of NBD-cholesterol than CH materials. Fluorescence intensities also varied between the incubation methods as well as the lens materials.

Conclusions : This study provides a novel in vitro approach to evaluating deposition and penetration of lipids on CLs. We show that the traditional “in-vial” incubation method exposes the CLs to an excessively high amount of ATS on both the front and back surface of the lens, which results in an overestimation for cholesterol deposition. Our model, which incorporates important ocular factors such as intermittent air exposure, small tear volume, and physiological tear flow between blinks, provides a more natural environment for in vitro lens incubation. Consequently, this will better elucidate the interactions between CLs and tear film components.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

Figure1: NBD-cholesterol depth of penetration on various lens materials

Figure1: NBD-cholesterol depth of penetration on various lens materials

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