September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Choroidal vascularity in high myopia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jay Chhablani
    Vitreo-retina, L V Prasad Eye Insititute, Hyderabad, TS, India
  • Marupally Abhilash Goud
    Vitreo-retina, L V Prasad Eye Insititute, Hyderabad, TS, India
  • Kiran Kumar
    IIT, Hyderabad, India
  • Soumya Jana
    IIT, Hyderabad, India
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jay Chhablani, None; Marupally Abhilash Goud, None; Kiran Kumar, None; Soumya Jana, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 2166. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Jay Chhablani, Marupally Abhilash Goud, Kiran Kumar, Soumya Jana; Choroidal vascularity in high myopia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):2166.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To evaluate choroidal vascularity in eyes with high myopia in comparison to age-matched healthy subjects.

Methods : Retrospective analysis of a single enhanced depth optical coherence tomography (EDI) scans (passing through fovea) of 30 eyes (30 patients) with high myopia (axial length more than 25mm) was performed. Choroidal vascularity was evaluated by calculating vessel area:stromal area ratio and percentage vascularity using previously validated automated algorithm. (Figure 1) Comparison of these parameters with 30 eyes of 30 age-matched healthy subjects was performed.

Results : Mean age (years) among high myopic eyes and age-matched healthy eyes was 42.95±16.51 and 44.42±15.45 (p=0.37) respectively.
Sex (Male:Female) ratio among high myopic eyes and age-matched healthy eyes was 11:21 and 13:17 respectively.
Mean axial length (mm) in high myopic eyes and age-matched healthy eyes was 26.25±0.71 and 23.62±1.01 (p=0.000) respectively.
Total Choroid area (mm3) was significantly less in high myopic eyes compared to control group (1.38±0.33 vs 1.83±0.42,p= 0.000).
Stromal area (mm3) was found to be significantly decreased in high myopes compared to control group (0.95±0.22 vs 1.33±0.23, p=0.000). In contrast, there was no significant difference in vessel area (mm3) between two groups (0.50±0.33 vs 0.42±0.18,p=0.15).
There was no significant difference in vessel area:stromal area ratio between the group (high myopes, 0.39±0.27 and control group, 0.45±0.17; p=0.16) Choroidal vascularity percentage in high myopic eyes and age-matched healthy eyes was 30.25±8.51 and 25.46±14.05 respectively with no significant difference (p=0.07).

Conclusions : This study reports that the choroidal thinning in high myopia is primarily associated with reduction in choroidal stroma, not the vascular component. This needs further exploration and has potential for clinical application.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

 

Figure 1: Top image shows enhanced depth imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography scan of a high myopic eye. Middle image shows automated segmentation of choroidal borders using validated algorithm. Bottom image shows the vascular (dark) and stromal (white) areas in the segmented portion using an automated algorithm. Ratio of vascular and stromal area and percentage of vascularity is calculated from the bottom image.

Figure 1: Top image shows enhanced depth imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography scan of a high myopic eye. Middle image shows automated segmentation of choroidal borders using validated algorithm. Bottom image shows the vascular (dark) and stromal (white) areas in the segmented portion using an automated algorithm. Ratio of vascular and stromal area and percentage of vascularity is calculated from the bottom image.

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