September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Diurnal Blink Tracking of Symptomatic Contact Lens Wearers
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Endri Angjeli
    Research and Development, Ora, Inc., Andover, Massachusetts, United States
  • John David Rodriguez
    Research and Development, Ora, Inc., Andover, Massachusetts, United States
  • Keith Jeffrey Lane
    Research and Development, Ora, Inc., Andover, Massachusetts, United States
  • George W Ousler
    Dry Eye, Ora, Inc., Andover, Massachusetts, United States
  • Michael Watson
    Dry Eye, Ora, Inc., Andover, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Endri Angjeli, Ora, Inc. (E); John Rodriguez, Ora,Inc. (E); Keith Lane, Ora, Inc. (E); George Ousler, Ora, Inc. (E); Michael Watson, Ora, Inc. (E)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1486. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Endri Angjeli, John David Rodriguez, Keith Jeffrey Lane, George W Ousler, Michael Watson; Diurnal Blink Tracking of Symptomatic Contact Lens Wearers
      . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1486.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Purpose : End-of-day discomfort and dryness are frequent complaints associated with soft contact lens wear. Rapid blinking and other changes in blink patterns have been shown to result from increased ocular discomfort and dryness1. Using a blink tracking system, this study compared subject-reported symptoms with diurnal blink patterns in habitual contact lens wearers.

1Nakamori K, Odawara M, Nakajima T, Mizutani T, Tsubota K. Blinking is Controlled Primarily by Ocular Surface Conditions. American J. of Ophthalmology 1997; 124(1): 24-30.

Methods : 9 habitual wearers of silicon hydrogel contact lenses were enrolled in an IRB-approved clinical trial. Informed consent and medical history were obtained from all subjects. Subjects were required to have had reported actual contact lens wear duration exceeding comfortable wear duration by at least 3 hours over the previous month. Subjects had no prior diagnosis of ocular disease. All subjects were fitted with an EKG-based blink tracking device that recorded diurnal blinking (expressed as mean hourly interblink interval (IBI)) for a minimum of ten hours while performing normal daily activities. Subjects recorded ocular symptoms (0-4 scale) in a take-home diary.

Results : During the day, mean ocular discomfort recorded in the diary increased 0.034 units per hour (0-4 scale) based on linear regression (r=0.63). Consequently, mean daily ocular discomfort was relatively low (0.74 ± 0.20). Mean hourly IBI (seconds) decreased at 0.109 seconds per hour (r=0.788) with mean IBI over the day at (3.80sec ± 0.44sec). Ocular discomfort and mean hourly IBI were negatively correlated over the day (r=-0.477).

Conclusions : Diurnal blink tracking may be an effective tool for understanding patterns of lens wear intolerance. As this study included only lens wearers with end-of-day discomfort, more work must be completed with comfortable lens wearers to understand the independent contribution of symptoms to blink pattern abnormalities.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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