September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
The Impact of Exercise on Quality of Life and Progression of Disease in Retinitis Pigmentosa
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joshua Levinson
    Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Ethan Joseph
    Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Joe Nocera
    Center for Visual and Neurocognitive Rehabilitation, Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Laura Ward
    Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Machelle T Pardue
    Center for Visual and Neurocognitive Rehabilitation, Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Beau B Bruce
    Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Jiong Yan
    Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Joshua Levinson, None; Ethan Joseph, None; Joe Nocera, None; Laura Ward, None; Machelle Pardue, None; Beau Bruce, None; Jiong Yan, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Core Grant EY006360, Research to Prevent Blindness, Dept. of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation R&D Service Research Career Scientist Award C9257S (MTP)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 136. doi:
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      Joshua Levinson, Ethan Joseph, Joe Nocera, Laura Ward, Machelle T Pardue, Beau B Bruce, Jiong Yan; The Impact of Exercise on Quality of Life and Progression of Disease in Retinitis Pigmentosa. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):136.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Exercise has been found to be neuroprotective in animal models of retinal degeneration. This study aims to evaluate exercise patterns in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and investigate the effect of exercise on quality of life (QOL) and visual function.

Methods : Adult patients with RP seen at a single academic center between 2005 - 2014 were identified. Exercise habits were assessed using the Godin Leisure-time Exercise Questionnaire via telephone survey. The SF-36 general health survey, National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionaire-25 (NEI VFQ-25), and Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability (PAT-D) were administered to evaluate QOL. A retrospective chart review was conducted to evaluate visual function including visual acuity, Goldmann visual fields (GVF), and electroretinography. Clinical data was collected at the initial and final visits.

Results : 142 of 496 patients participated in the phone survey (28.6%). The mean age of study participants was 46.4 years. For patients with multiple clinic visits, the median length of follow-up was 4.3 years. The Godin exercise survey revealed 78 (56.1%) “active”, 26 (18.7%) “moderately active”, and 35 (25.2%) “insufficiently active” patients. “Active” patients reported significantly less disability on PAT-D evaluation than “insufficiently active” patients (24.6 vs 30.5, p=0.03). 67 patients were employed (47.5%). Employed patients scored significantly better on vision-related QOL testing (56.7 vs. 43.9, p<0.0001) and the Pepper disability survey (24.2 vs. 29.4, p=0.01) than unemployed patients. “Active” patients scored higher on the NEI VFQ-25 than “insufficiently active” patients (52.8 vs. 45.5, p=0.08) though this did not reach statistical significance. Mean initial best-corrected logMAR visual acuity in the better-seeing eye was 0.66 (Snellen 20/91). The mean combined initial horizontal-vertical III4e GVF score was 56.9 degrees in the right eye and 62.9 degrees in the left eye. “Active” patients had higher mean GVF scores than “insufficiently active” patients for both right and left eye visual fields though these differences did not reach statistical significance (Right 66.2 vs. 40.3, p=0.17. Left 64.7 vs. 52.5, p=0.73).

Conclusions : More research is warranted to evaluate the influence of exercise on QOL and progression of disease in RP.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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