September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Lutein and Zeaxanthin (L+Z) Intake and Prevalent Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Henry Lin
    Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, United States
  • Michael J LaMonte
    Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, United States
  • William Brady
    Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, United States
  • Michelle Sahli
    Department of Public Health and Health Sciences, The University of Michigan–Flint, Flint, Michigan, United States
  • Julie A Mares
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Ronald Klein
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Barbara E K Klein
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Jing Nie
    Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, United States
  • Amy E Millen
    Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Henry Lin, None; Michael LaMonte, None; William Brady, None; Michelle Sahli, None; Julie Mares, None; Ronald Klein, None; Barbara Klein, None; Jing Nie, None; Amy Millen, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 19. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Henry Lin, Michael J LaMonte, William Brady, Michelle Sahli, Julie A Mares, Ronald Klein, Barbara E K Klein, Jing Nie, Amy E Millen; Lutein and Zeaxanthin (L+Z) Intake and Prevalent Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):19.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : No clinical trial has investigated the effect of L+Z supplementation on early AMD, and results from observational studies have been mixed. Data from 10,295 adults enrolled in the ARIC Study, an epidemiologic cohort (mean age 53.9 years), was used to examine the association between L+Z intake and prevalent early AMD. Potential effect modification by genetic risk factors and biomarkers of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) metabolism was explored.

Methods : L+Z intake was assessed at visit 1 (1987-89) with a food frequency questionnaire. AMD was assessed at visit 3 (1993-95) via non-mydriatic retinal imaging of a randomly-chosen eye. Plasma samples collected at visit 1 were used to measure lipid concentrations (HDL, HDL2, HDL3, and apolipoprotein A-1 [apo-A1]) and obtain DNA for genotyping of the Y402H complement factor H (CFH) rs1061170 and the A69S age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) rs10490924 polymorphisms. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for AMD by quintiles of L+Z, adjusted for age, sex, race, study center, and pack-years of smoking. To evaluate effect modification, the association between tertiles (T) of L+Z and AMD were stratified by genotype and by median cutpoints of HDL biomarkers.

Results : L+Z intake was not associated with AMD in the overall sample, in Caucasians (n=8,257), or African-Americans (n=2,038). Exploratory analyses showed that among Caucasians, higher L+Z intake was associated with decreased odds of AMD in carriers of the moderate-risk CT genotype of CFH (T3 vs. T1, OR=0.57, 95% CI 0.36-0.91), but not the low-risk TT (OR=1.33, 95% CI 0.82-2.16) or high-risk CC genotypes (OR=1.37, 95% CI 0.82-2.28, p for interaction=0.022). No interactions were observed between L+Z and ARMS2 in Caucasians, or with either polymorphism in African-Americans. Moreover, higher L+Z intake trended towards decreased odds of AMD among participants with lower HDL (OR=0.79, 95% CI 0.57-1.09), but not higher HDL (OR=1.14, 95% CI 0.83-1.58, p for interaction=0.048). Stratification by HDL2 and apo-A1 revealed similar trends.

Conclusions : L+Z intake was not associated with early AMD in this biracial cohort of middle-aged adults. Further research is needed to clarify potential interactions with genetic susceptibility and HDL metabolism.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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