September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Corneal Lymphangiogenesis in a murine bacterial keratitis model.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Akitomo Narimatsu
    ophthalmology, Tokyo medical university, Tokyo, Shinjuku, Japan
  • Tkaaki Hattori
    ophthalmology, Tokyo medical university, Tokyo, Shinjuku, Japan
  • Naoto Koike
    Microbiology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Kazuki Tajima
    Surgery, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Hayate Nakagawa
    ophthalmology, Tokyo medical university, Tokyo, Shinjuku, Japan
  • Haruki Katahira
    ophthalmology, Tokyo medical university, Tokyo, Shinjuku, Japan
  • Shigeto Kumakura
    ophthalmology, Tokyo medical university, Tokyo, Shinjuku, Japan
  • Hiroshi Goto
    ophthalmology, Tokyo medical university, Tokyo, Shinjuku, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Akitomo Narimatsu, None; Tkaaki Hattori, None; Naoto Koike, None; Kazuki Tajima, None; Hayate Nakagawa, None; Haruki Katahira, None; Shigeto Kumakura, None; Hiroshi Goto, None
  • Footnotes
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Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 323. doi:
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      Akitomo Narimatsu, Tkaaki Hattori, Naoto Koike, Kazuki Tajima, Hayate Nakagawa, Haruki Katahira, Shigeto Kumakura, Hiroshi Goto; Corneal Lymphangiogenesis in a murine bacterial keratitis model.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):323.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To evaluate corneal lymphangiogenesis and involvement of macrophages in a bacterial keratitis model in mice using Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Methods : The mouse bacterial keratitis model was established using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO-1 and C57BL/6 mice. Strain PAO-1 (1×104 CFU/25 ml) were applied to epithelial scratched corneas in the infected group, and PBS was applied after epithelial scratch in the control group. We evaluated lymphangiogenesis, angiogenesis, and macrophage infiltration by immunostaining of whole-mount corneas at days 2, 7 and 14 post-inoculation. Anti-CD31 antibody, anti-LYVE-1 antibody and anti-CD11b antibody were used for immunostaining. Alteration of lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis by macrophage depletion was also evaluated using clodronate-containing liposomes.

Results : Lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis increased significantly in infected group at days 7 and 14 post-inoculation. A significant number of macrophages was observed around the lymphatic vessels in infected group. Moreover, macrophage depletion significantly reduced lymphatic vessel formation in infected group.

Conclusions : These results suggest that the process of lymphangiogenesis in bacterial infection of the cornea occurs at the late stage of infection probably induced by infiltrating macrophages.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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