September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
The antifungal efficacy of amphotericin B against Fusarium and Aspergillus in corneal storage media
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine Duncan
    Ophthalmology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Jeff Parker
    Pathology Associates, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Caroline Hoover
    SightLife, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Bennie H Jeng
    Ophthalmology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Katherine Duncan, None; Jeff Parker, None; Caroline Hoover , None; Bennie Jeng, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 343. doi:
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      Katherine Duncan, Jeff Parker, Caroline Hoover, Bennie H Jeng; The antifungal efficacy of amphotericin B against Fusarium and Aspergillus in corneal storage media. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):343.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The incidence of postkeratoplasty fungal infection is increasing in the United States, and our most commonly used corneal storage media, Optisol-GS, contains antibiotics but no antifungal agents. We previously demonstrated the efficacy of amphotericin B additives in eliminating Candida albicans contaminants in Optisol-GS. The purpose of this study was to determine if the amphotericin B additive would also be efficacious against Fusarium solani and Aspergillus fumigatus.

Methods : Vials of Optisol-GS were supplemented with Amphotericin B 0.255 μg/mL. Half of the vials were inoculated with F.solani and half were inoculated with A. fumigatus. Positive control vials were inoculated with the fungi but no amphotericin B. The vials were refrigerated at 4 degrees C. Samples from each vial were collected and plated after 48 hours. The plates were then incubated at 30 degrees C for 48 hours after which fungal colony counts were performed.

Results : Fungal growth was present on all plated samples. The vials containing amphotericin B additive and F. solani grew an average of 12.83 colonies while the positive control vial containing F. solani but no amphotericin B grew 23 colonies. The vials containing amphotericin B additive and A. fumigatus grew an average of 4.83 colonies while the positive control vial containing A. fumigatus but no amphotericin B grew 8 colonies. Overall, amphotericin B additive decreased fungal growth in Optisol-GS by 44%(p=0.0573) for F. solani and by 40% for A. fumigatus (p=0.3142).

Conclusions : This study confirms that amphotericin B additives in Optisol-GS reduce the growth of F. solani and A. fumigatus contaminants at 48 hours. We plan to continue to sample the Optisol-GS vials at different time points to determine how long it takes amphotericin B additives to completely eliminate F. solani and A. fumigatus contaminants in Optisol-GS.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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