September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Environmental Risk Factors for the Development of Concurrent Involutional Lower Lid Entropion and Upper Lid Ptosis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kendra Clemons
    Ophthalmology, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
    Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
  • Michael E Migliori
    Ophthalmology, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
    Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Kendra Clemons, None; Michael Migliori, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 714. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Kendra Clemons, Michael E Migliori; Environmental Risk Factors for the Development of Concurrent Involutional Lower Lid Entropion and Upper Lid Ptosis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):714.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To identify environmental risk factors associated with the development of concurrent involutional lower lid entropion and upper lid ptosis.

Methods : After receiving institutional review board approval from Rhode Island Hospital, we reviewed the medical records of patients referred to three oculoplastic surgeons for evaluation of involutional entropion from January 2009 to Januarry 2014. We exckuded oatuebts with previous eyelid or intraocular surgery, trauma, and thyroid eye disease. We collected patient's age, gender, ethnicity, medical comorbidities, smoking history, alcohol use, and the marginal distance reflex (MRD1). Visually significant ptosis was 2 millimeters (mm) or less. We analyzed the data using chi-square test, t-test, and the factorial generalized estimating equation (p< 0.05).

Results : There were 181 records that met our inclusion criteria; 56 patients were exclided; 125 were entered into the study. The prevalence of ptosis and involutional entropion was 30.6% (38); 18 (15%) patients had never used tobacco, 37 (29.7%) patients reported tobacco use (p<0.05); 27 (22%) reported alcohol use and 28 (23%) reported no alcohol use (p=0.9332). The mean MRD1 in patients that reported neither alcohol nor tobacco use was 1.8 mm (p<0.05). The mean MRD1 in patients that reported alcohol use was 2.9 mm (p< 0.05); the mean MRD1 in patients that reported tobacco use was 0.9 mm (p<0.05), which was visually significant ptosis. The mean MRD1 for patients that reported both tobacco and alcohol use was 1.3 mm (p< 0.05).

Conclusions : Smoking may play a role in the development of concurrent involutional lower lid entropion and upper lid ptosis.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×