September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
The effects of transiently raised IOP on retinal function and retinal ganglion cell loss in an animal model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jie Zhang
    Ophthalmology, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Peny Lin
    Ophthalmology, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Monica L Acosta
    Department of Optometry and Vision Science, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Colin Green
    Ophthalmology, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Helen Danesh-Meyer
    Ophthalmology, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jie Zhang, None; Peny Lin, None; Monica Acosta, None; Colin Green, None; Helen Danesh-Meyer, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  The New Zealand Save Sight Society
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, No Pagination Specified. doi:
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      Jie Zhang, Peny Lin, Monica L Acosta, Colin Green, Helen Danesh-Meyer; The effects of transiently raised IOP on retinal function and retinal ganglion cell loss in an animal model. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 201657(12):.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Purpose : The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of transient moderate intraocular pressure (IOP) increase on long-term retinal function and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival, and short-term occurrence of inflammation and gap junction protein regulation in the rat eye and compare these with effects in age-matched control rats.

Methods : Sprague Dawley rats with transient IOP at 40 mmHg for 5 or 30 minutes, and 60 mmHg for 5 minutes (via cannulation of the anterior chamber with a saline raised to a height corresponding to the desired IOP) were assessed immunohistochemically for changes in the optic nerve and retina in the short term based on glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and connexin43 expression, a gap junction protein recognised as being upregulated with neuroinflammation. Retinal function was assessed using electroretinography recorded at baseline and 14 days after the IOP and compared with RGC counts.

Results : Results showed that there was a differential GFAP labelling pattern observed in the anterior optic nerve in the 40 mmHg 30 minute and 60 mmHg 5 minute groups 4 hours after manipulation. Gap junction protein connexin43 was minimally up-regulated in the retina in the short-term. There was minimal long-term effect on retinal function and no retinal ganglion cell loss. In conclusion, transient IOP spikes affect glial response in the optic nerve in the short term without affecting gap junction expression or the responsiveness of the retina. No other significant retinal functional changes or reduction in RGC number was found.

Conclusions : Short spikes in IOP occurring during surgical procedures therefore appear to be relatively safe, especially when the procedure is only performed once and swiftly.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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