September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016

Triptolide Efficiently Inhibits Choroidal Neovascularization In a Laser-Induced Mouse Model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chen-Jin Jin
    Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Guangzhou, China
  • Wenbo Zhao
    Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Guangzhou, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Chen-Jin Jin, None; Wenbo Zhao, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Grant 303090100502002 from the Technology Program of Guangdong Province, P. R. China
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1129. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Chen-Jin Jin, Wenbo Zhao;
      Triptolide Efficiently Inhibits Choroidal Neovascularization In a Laser-Induced Mouse Model. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1129.

      Download citation file:


      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose :
To investigate the effects of triptolide on choroidal neovascularization (CNV) using a laser-induced mouse model.

Methods :
The laser photocoagulation was performed to induce CNV in C57BL/6J mice, followed by the intraperitoneal injection of triptolide or vehicle. Seven days after the treatment, the CNV sizes were evaluated using choroidal flatmount technique. The leakages of laser spots were measured by fundus fluorescein angiography. Effects of triptolide on the proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were studied in vitro. Effects of triptolide on the viability of human retinal pigment epithelium cell line (ARPE19) were studied in vitro. The toxicity of triptolide on retina, liver, kidney and heart were evaluated.

Results : Triptolide significantly suppressed the CNV formation in a dose-dependent manner and significantly alleviated the laser spot leakage in laser-induced CNV mouse model. Triptolide was not significantly toxic on retina, liver, kidney and heart at 0.07mg/kg BW. Triptolide significantly suppressed the proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs. Triptolide at 600 ng/ml did not compromise the viability of ARPE19 cells at 24 hours.

Conclusions :

Triptolide can be potentially used as a novel chemical therapy for CNV.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×