September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
A novel ex vivo model of equine corneal wound healing
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rita Wehrman
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, United States
  • Joseph Haynes
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, United States
  • Gil Ben-Shlomo
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Rita Wehrman, None; Joseph Haynes, None; Gil Ben-Shlomo, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1287. doi:
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      Rita Wehrman, Joseph Haynes, Gil Ben-Shlomo; A novel ex vivo model of equine corneal wound healing. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1287.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Purpose : To develop an ex vivo model of equine corneal epithelial wound healing while maintaining normal corneal anatomy.

Methods : Equine corneas were harvested within two hours of humane euthanasia (for reasons unrelated to this study) and immediately processed. Corneoscleral rims were excised 2mm posterior to the limbus. The axial cornea was wounded with filter paper soaked in 1N NaOH and epithelial ulceration confirmed employing fluorescein stain. Corneas were subsequently cultured using an air-liquid interface model in media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 10ng/ml human growth factor and 5ug/ml bovine pancreatic insulin. The rocker was set to bathe the cornea 8 times per minute to simulate normal horse blinking. Corneas were stained with fluorescein and imaged every other day to assess wound healing. Ulcer size was analyzed using an image processing program and corneas were submitted for histologic evaluation when fluorescein negative.

Results : All corneas healed within 4 days (96 hours) of epithelial ulceration. Histologically, corneas maintained normal architecture including viable epithelium and minimal stromal edema.

Conclusions : Air-liquid interface with media bathing is an effective ex vivo model of equine corneal wound healing.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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