September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Dendritic remodeling in early-stage glaucoma: Evidence from genetically identified retinal ganglion cell types
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andy Huberman
    Neurosciences and Ophthalmology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Andy Huberman, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH, National Eye Institute and the Glaucoma Research Foundation Catalyst for a Cure
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, No Pagination Specified. doi:
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      Andy Huberman; Dendritic remodeling in early-stage glaucoma: Evidence from genetically identified retinal ganglion cell types. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 201657(12):.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Presentation Description : A longstanding question in the field of glaucoma is whether specific types of neurons, and/or their sub-cellular compartments, are selectively altered at different stages of the disease. I will present data that retinal ganglion cells whose processes reside near specific regions of the retinal vaculature 'sublayers' are altered in early stages of glaucoma in a manner that predicts cell loss. Additionally, I will review data showing how visual stimulation can act as a potent stimulator of retinal neuron survival and regeneration in response to disease and injury. The relationhip between retinal vasculature, neural activity and disease progression will be considered in light of animal models and human clinical data.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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