September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Changing prevalence, and incidence and progression of myopia in Singapore teenagers: the SCORM cohort
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Seang-Mei Saw
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore
    Epidemiology, Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, Singapore, Singapore
  • Adeola Awodele
    Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore
  • Ching-Yu Cheng
    Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore
  • Yin-Bun Cheung
    Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore
  • Donald Tan
    Singapore National Eye Center, Singapore, Singapore
    Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore
  • Tien Yin Wong
    Singapore National Eye Center, Singapore, Singapore
    Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Seang-Mei Saw, None; Adeola Awodele, None; Ching-Yu Cheng, None; Yin-Bun Cheung, None; Donald Tan, None; Tien Wong, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  National Medical Research Council Singapore 0695/2005
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, No Pagination Specified. doi:
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      Seang-Mei Saw, Adeola Awodele, Ching-Yu Cheng, Yin-Bun Cheung, Donald Tan, Tien Yin Wong; Changing prevalence, and incidence and progression of myopia in Singapore teenagers: the SCORM cohort. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 201657(12):.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Purpose : To describe trends in prevalence, and incidence and progression rates of myopia among Singapore teenagers in the Singapore Cohort Study of the Risk Factors for myopia (SCORM).

Methods : The SCORM study is a longitudinal school-based study that recruited 1979 children aged 7 to 9 years old, who were initially examined annually over a 9-year period (1999-2007). The data from children who were examined at years 8 (n=1249) and 9 (n=1036) are presented here. At each follow-up visit, the children underwent comprehensive eye examinations that included cycloplegic autorefraction (Canon RK-F1) and ocular biometry measurements using the A-scan biometry machine.

Results : The prevalence of myopia (SE<-0.5D) and high myopia (SE<-6.0D) among Singapore teenagers aged 11-18 years old was 69.2% [95% confidence interval (CI) 66.5-71.7] and 7.1% (95% CI 5.8-8.7), respectively. The prevalence of myopia was highest in Chinese at 75.2%, and lower in Indians at 58.4% and Malays (52.7%) (p<0.001). The annual incidence was 14.3% (95% CI 10.4-18.2). Males had twice the incidence of females (p=0.021), and adolescents with longer axial lengths (p<0.001) and deeper vitreous chamber (p<0.001) had higher myopia incidence. The myopia progression rate was -0.33 Diopters (D) (SD=0.41) per year, with no difference by age, race or gender. The change in axial length was 0.29 mm (SD = 0.40) per year. However, adolescents with higher myopia levels at 2006 had significantly faster myopia progression rates (p<0.001).

Conclusions : Myopia prevalence rates in Singapore teenagers, especially Singapore Chinese teenagers, continue to be one of the highest in the world. Compared with the previous initial annual incidence (48%) and progression rates (0.8 D per year) in 7 to 9 years, the annual incidence and progression rates were lower during teenage years in the same SCORM children.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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