September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
In vitro lipid deposition and extraction from two silicone hydrogel contact lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Simin Masoudi
    Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Todd Mitchell
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Mark D P Willcox
    Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Simin Masoudi, Alcon (F); Todd Mitchell, None; Mark Willcox, Alcon (F), Alcon (C)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Sponsored by Alcon
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1477. doi:
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      Simin Masoudi, Todd Mitchell, Mark D P Willcox; In vitro lipid deposition and extraction from two silicone hydrogel contact lenses. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1477.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Purpose : To determine the tenacity of lipid adsorption in vitro on two silicone hydrogel contact lenses.

Methods : Unworn narafilcon A and senofilcon A contact lenses (n = 10) were soaked in a lipid solution (containing lysophosphatidylcholine [LPC], phosphatidylcholine [PC], lysophosphatidylethanolamine [LPE], phosphatidylethanolamine [PE], cholesterol ester [CE], wax ester [WE], (O-acyl)-ω-hydroxy fatty acid [OAHFA], triacylglycerol [TAG], phosphatidylethanolamine [PE], dihydrosphingomyelin [SM], phosphatidylserine [PS], ceramide and free cholesterol [FC] – based on levels of each lipid found in meibum) in methanol for 14 hours. Lipids were then extracted from contact lenses using a MBTE:methanol solution (10:3 vol/vol) over time (1, 5, 30 and 45 minutes). The extract was washed with aqueous ammonium acetate, before analysis by chip based nanoelectrospray ionization linear ion trap-triple quadruple mass spectrometry.

Results : All twelve lipid classes were detected in extracts, but there were differences between the lens types. Non-polar lipids were adsorbed more than polar lipids to both lens types. Less lipid was desorbed from the narafilcon A lenses compared to the senofilcon A lenses ([mean ± 95% CI] 105,625 ± 47,379 vs. 486,079 ± 268,320 relative intensity, p = 0.03). More ceramide, WE and CE desorbed from senofilcon A lenses (p<0.05). Overall, all lipids were desorbed from narafilcon A lenses (≤30 min) faster than from senofilcon A (≥45 min).

Conclusions : Narafilcon A lenses desorbed less lipids overall than senofilcon A lenses. The difference in time of desorption suggests a more tenacious binding of lipids or deeper penetration of lipids into the senofilcon A lenses.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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