September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Impact of Clinical and Sociodemographic Variables on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in a Diabetic Population in Chicago
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deepak Mangla
    Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Kathryn L Jackson
    Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Dustin French
    Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Michael Mbagwu
    Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Paul Bryar
    Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Deepak Mangla, None; Kathryn Jackson, None; Dustin French, None; Michael Mbagwu, None; Paul Bryar, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Supported by unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, New York, NY and NEI Grant #: EY024050
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1593. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Deepak Mangla, Kathryn L Jackson, Dustin French, Michael Mbagwu, Paul Bryar; Impact of Clinical and Sociodemographic Variables on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in a Diabetic Population in Chicago. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1593.

      Download citation file:


      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To assess if there is a statistically significant difference in Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels across four different variables: age, race, insurance status and best-documented visual acuity (BDVA).

Methods : A retrospective chart review was performed from Jan 2013 to Dec 2015, using the Northwestern Enterprise Data Warehouse to identify all diabetic patients with 2 ophthalmologic evaluations within a 3-year span. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of diabetes with ICD-9 codes of 250.00-250.93, an age of 18 and over, and at least one HbA1c result over the last year. The following data points were examined: HgbA1c, age, race (Caucasian, African American, Hispanic/Asian/Other), insurance status (Medicaid, Medicare, private, uninsured), and BDVA. Visual acuities were grouped in clusters: 20/40 or better, 20/50 – 20/80, 20/100 or worse. Statistical significance was defined as p-value <0.05.

Results : A total of 3209 patients were included in the study. The mean age of patients was 61.4 years. The mean HgbA1c was 7.15 mg/dl. Over 95% of patients had a visual acuity of 20/40 or better. Medicare comprised 42% of patients, private insurance 40%, uninsured 12%, and Medicaid 6%. HbA1c was found to decrease 0.17 mg/dl with every year of age. The mean HbA1c for Caucasians compared with African Americans was lower by 0.38 mg/dl, while Caucasians compared with Hispanics/Asian/Others was lower by 0.32 mg/dl. Uninsured patients had a higher mean HbA1c compared with private insurance patients by 0.24 mg/dl, and Medicare patients by 0.65 mg/dl. Medicare patients had a lower HbA1c compared with Medicaid patients by 0.58 mg/dl, and private patients by 0.41 mg/dl. All reported differences in means were found to be statistically significant. There was no statistically significant correlation between HbA1c and BDVA.

Conclusions : HbA1c was found to decrease with every year of age. This may help explain the result of the Medicare population having the lowest overall HbA1c of any insurance group, as the Medicare population begins at 65 years, and our mean age of all patients was 61 years. Caucasians were found to have the lowest overall HbA1c. There was no correlation with HbA1c and visual acuity; however, over 95% of patients had a visual acuity of 20/40 or better.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×