September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Reading speed for Korean text in central and peripheral vision
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • So Ri Baek
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Yingchen He
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Gordon E Legge
    Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   So Baek, None; Yingchen He, None; Gordon Legge, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH grant EY002934
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 1948. doi:
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      So Ri Baek, Yingchen He, Gordon E Legge; Reading speed for Korean text in central and peripheral vision. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):1948.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Comparison of reading speed in central and peripheral vision is relevant for understanding the problems faced by people with central scotomas. We extended previous work on English reading to Korean, a language with more complex orthography than English. We measured the effects of print size in central and peripheral vision using the Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) method. We asked whether the pattern of findings for Korean would be similar to those for English. We hypothesized that 1) as the print size increases, the subject would show higher reading speed until a Critical Print Size (CPS) is reached, and then plateau at a Maximum Reading Speed (MRS); and that 2) the MRS would be higher for central vision than for peripheral vision.

Methods : 900 short Korean RSVP sentences (~9 words) were created with elementary school-level words and were presented to seven normally sighted Korean native speakers (mean age = 22.7) in print sizes from 0.1 degrees to 0.5 degrees in central vision and 1.2 degrees to 3.2 degrees in peripheral vision (10 degrees inferior). For each condition, word exposure times were varied to find the reading speed for which the subject read 80% of the words correctly.

Results : The pattern of results was similar for Korean reading and English reading, with speed dependent on print size for small print and independent of print size above the CPS. Mean values of Maximum Reading Speed for Korean reading were 691.95±50.98 wpm in central vision and 130.05±20.71 wpm in peripheral vision. Corresponding values for English reading from Chung et al. (Vision Res., 1998) were 807 wpm (central) and 135 wpm (peripheral).

Conclusions : We conclude that peripheral vision is capable of supporting functionally useful reading of Korean text. Like English, however, maximum reading speed is substantially slower in peripheral vision than in central vision.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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