September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Factors Predictive of Improved Sleep Quality after Cataract Surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aya Kokune
    Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Japan
  • Kazuno Negishi
    Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Japan
  • Masahiko Ayaki
    Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Japan
  • Kazuo Tsubota
    Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Aya Kokune, None; Kazuno Negishi, None; Masahiko Ayaki, None; Kazuo Tsubota, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 2009. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Aya Kokune, Kazuno Negishi, Masahiko Ayaki, Kazuo Tsubota; Factors Predictive of Improved Sleep Quality after Cataract Surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):2009.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : We reported previously that sleep quality improves after cataract surgery in poor sleepers using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). We conducted this study to determine the preoperative factors that predict that improvement.

Methods : One hundred eighty patients (average age, 74.2 years) undergoing cataract surgery with implantation of an intraocular lens were included in the study. Patients were evaluated using the PSQI before and 2 months after surgery. Multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the effects of age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, preoperative PSQI, and preoperative visual acuity (VA) on the improvement in the PSQI score. The improvement in the PSQI score was determined by subtracting the preoperative PSQI score from the postoperative PSQI score. All VA data were converted to equivalent logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) units.

Results : Of the 180 patients, 81 (45.0%) patients were classified as poor sleepers (PSQI >5.5) preoperatively. More women than men were classified as poor sleepers (p<0.05, chi-square test). The PSQI scores before and after cataract surgery were, respectively, 8.5 ± 2.9 and 7.4 ± 3.3 for poor sleepers and 2.8 ± 1.5 and 3.2 ± 2.0 for normal sleepers. Significant (p<0.05, Wilcoxon’s test) improvements in the PSQI scores were seen in the poor sleepers. Stepwise regression analysis of predictors showed that the preoperative PSQI score and preoperative VA in the better eye were significant (r=0.411, F=14.715, p=0.00) predictors of the degree of improvement in the PSQI scores. The multiple regression equation was: PSQI improvement = -1.156 + (0.216 x preoperative PSQI) + (1.670 x logMAR in the better eye). The standardized coefficients for PSQI and VA in the better eye were 0.354 and 0.181, respectively.

Conclusions : Preoperative poor sleep quality and low VA may predict more improvement in sleep quality after cataract surgery.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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