September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Microglia specialization in the primate macula: Changes in distribution and morphology with retinal position and aging.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janani Singaravelu
    Unit on Neuron-Glia Interactions in Retinal Disease, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Lian Zhao
    Unit on Neuron-Glia Interactions in Retinal Disease, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Robert N Fariss
    National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • T Michael Nork
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison , Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Wai T Wong
    Unit on Neuron-Glia Interactions in Retinal Disease, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Janani Singaravelu, None; Lian Zhao, None; Robert Fariss, None; T Michael Nork, None; Wai Wong, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH MRSP
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 2230. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Janani Singaravelu, Lian Zhao, Robert N Fariss, T Michael Nork, Wai T Wong; Microglia specialization in the primate macula: Changes in distribution and morphology with retinal position and aging.
      . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):2230.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Microglia, the primary resident immune cell in the CNS, has been studied in the retina but predominantly in rodent models that lack a macula. To understand how microglia may demonstrate specializations within the macula and how these specializations may change with aging, we examined the distribution and morphology of microglia at different retinal positions in young and aged primate retina.

Methods : Flat-mounted retina tissue from the foveal, outer macular, and extramacular peripheral retina were isolated from young adult (4.2 years) and middle-aged (16.8 years) female Rhesus macaque primates. Immunohistochemistry for Iba1 (microglia), cone arrestin (cones), and isolectin IB4 (vasculature) was performed and imaged with confocal microscopy. Morphological analysis was performed using ImageJ software.

Results : Microglial density and morphology was not constant across the primate retina but demonstrated graded variations according to retinal position. Microglia demonstrated particular specializations in the fovea. Around the foveal avascular zone, microglia in the IPL were arranged in a circular pattern with their long axes tangential to the foveal center. Deeper in the OPL, microglia showed elongated morphologies that were oriented with their long axes in a radial pattern radiating from the foveal center. Further from the fovea, microglia in both outer macular (2.5 mm from foveal center) and peripheral extramacular (9 to 10 mm from foveal center) areas demonstrated more symmetric morphologies that tile the retina uniformly. Interestingly, microglial densities in these areas demonstrated differing changes with aging, with microglial density increasing in macular locations and conversely decreasing in peripheral locations with age.

Conclusions : Retinal microglia were not uniformly distributed across the primate retina with identical morphologies but instead demonstrated multiple regional specializations in morphology and density that vary with aging. These may reflect changes in immune function in the macula occurring with aging that are relevant to age-related macular disease.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×