September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Curcumin Protects Rod Photoreceptor Morphology, but not Function, in the P23H Knock-in Mouse Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patrick A Scott
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
  • Aaron Rising
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
  • Gobinda Pangeni
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
  • Maureen A McCall
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Patrick Scott, None; Aaron Rising, None; Gobinda Pangeni, None; Maureen McCall, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Research to Prevent Blindness, New York, NY; NIH EY014701 (MAMc)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 2739. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Patrick A Scott, Aaron Rising, Gobinda Pangeni, Maureen A McCall; Curcumin Protects Rod Photoreceptor Morphology, but not Function, in the P23H Knock-in Mouse Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):2739.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Rhodopsin localization and rod photoreceptor (PR) morphology is altered across all models of Pro23His (P23H) retinopathy. Curcumin, a component of the Indian spice Turmeric, is neuroprotective to rod PRs in transgenic P23H rats and swine embryos and promotes normal trafficking of rhodopsin. We tested the hypothesis that curcumin therapy would prevent PR degeneration in P23H knock-in mice.

Methods : Two litters of heterozygous P23H knock-in mice (n=14) and wild type (WT) littermates (n=4) were given curcumin (100 mg/Kg body weight) by oral gavage from postnatal (P) day 8 to P60. A third litter of untreated heterozygous mice (n=10) and WT (n=1) littermates were used as controls. At P60 retinal function was assessed using electroretinograms (ERGs), retinal ganglion cell (RGC) responses were recorded with the microelectrode array (MEA), and retinal morphology was evaluated using standard histology and immunohistochemistry.

Results : Mean outer nuclear layer thickness was significantly reduced in untreated heterozygous P23H knock-in mice compared to curcumin-treated. Rhodopsin localization was similar in WT and curcumin-treated mice. Scotopic visual function was similar in both curcumin-treated and untreated mice and significantly reduced compared to WT. RGC responses were similar in both curcumin-treated and untreated mice.

Conclusions : These data support a role for curcumin as a neuroprotective agent that delays morphological abnormalities that occur to rod PRs in a murine model of P23H retinopathy.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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