September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Effect of 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension in dry eye rabbit model
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hiroshi Toshida
    Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Izunokuni, Shizuoka, Japan
  • Toshihiko Ohta
    Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, Izunokuni, Shizuoka, Japan
  • Chikako Suto
    Ophthalmology, Saiseikai Kurihashi Hospital, Saitama, Japan
  • Koichiro Shinji
    Ophthalmology, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Maria Karasawa
    Ophthalmology, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Akira Murakami
    Ophthalmology, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Hiroshi Toshida, Otsuka (F); Toshihiko Ohta, None; Chikako Suto, None; Koichiro Shinji, None; Maria Karasawa, None; Akira Murakami, Otsuka (F), Santen (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 2870. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Hiroshi Toshida, Toshihiko Ohta, Chikako Suto, Koichiro Shinji, Maria Karasawa, Akira Murakami; Effect of 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension in dry eye rabbit model. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):2870.

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      © 2017 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.

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Abstract

Purpose : Rebamipide is developed as an antiulcer agent for gastric mucosal cell injury. The therapeutic effects of rebamipide are due to its ability to increase gastric mucus. Rebamipide ophthalmic suspension also improves corneal and conjunctival injury, increasing corneal and conjunctival mucin-like substances in vivo. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension in rabbit dry eye model.

Methods : Eighteen male New Zealand white rabbits underwent unilateral pre-ganglionic parasympathetic section of the greater superficial petrosal nerve (GSPN), the input to the pterygopatlatine ganglion as previously reported (Toshida et al, IOVS 48:4468-4475,2007). After denervation, rabbtis were randomly divided in 3 groups. So each group was consisted of 6 rabbits. Group 1 received no instillation after denervation, and performed as a non-treatment control. Group 2 was treated with 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension, and group 3 was with vehicle. Instillations of 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension (group 2) or vehicle (group 3) were done 4 times a day for 14 days. Clinical observations including fluorescein and rose bengal staining, tear break up time (BUT) and Schirmer’s tear tests (STT) were tested prior to and post operatively.

Results : There were no specific improve in non-treated group (group 1) and in vehicle treated group (group 2), and On the other hand, the fluorescein score was significantly improved only in the denervated side in rebamipide group (group 3) after 3 (0.83±0.41 (standard deviation)), 7 (0.33±0.52) and 14 (0.67±0.52) days of treatment compared to prior to treatment (1.50±0.55) (n=6, unpaired t-test; p<0.05, p<0.005, p<0.005 respectively). Rose bengal score and BUT were significantly improved in the denervated side in rebamipide group after 14 days (1.67±1.37, 17.2±2.48 sec) compared to prior to treatment (3.00±1.26, 11.2±4.54sec) (p<0.05, p<0.01, respectively). However, there were no changes in STT.

Conclusions : Rebamipide ophthalmic suspension is effective in the rabbit dry eye model. And it is suggested that improvement of keratoconjunctival epithelium was stabilized at an earlier stage than tear mucin film treated by rebamipide ophthalmic suspension.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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