September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Fingerprick Autologous Blood as a Novel Treatment for Dry Eye Syndrome and Persistent Epithelial Defects.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan Yun-Xian Leong Than
    Moorfields Eye Centre at Bedford Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • James Wawrzynski
    Moorfields Eye Centre at Bedford Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Johnny Moore
    The Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, United Kingdom
  • Amit Patel
    Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Sunil Shah
    Birmingham and Midland Eye Centre at City Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Nisha Nesaratnam
    Moorfields Eye Centre at Bedford Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Anant Sharma
    Moorfields Eye Centre at Bedford Hospital, London, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jonathan Than, None; James Wawrzynski, None; Johnny Moore, None; Amit Patel, None; Sunil Shah, None; Nisha Nesaratnam, None; Anant Sharma, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 2880. doi:
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      Jonathan Yun-Xian Leong Than, James Wawrzynski, Johnny Moore, Amit Patel, Sunil Shah, Nisha Nesaratnam, Anant Sharma; Fingerprick Autologous Blood as a Novel Treatment for Dry Eye Syndrome and Persistent Epithelial Defects.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):2880.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Dry eye syndrome (DES) secondary to Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) causes significant morbidity. Trials of blood-derived products (e.g. autologous serum, platelet-derived plasma) in treatment of the condition show promising results. However, their production is expensive and time-consuming. We investigate fingerprick autologous blood (FAB) as an alternative low-cost, readily accessible treatment for DES, and also for persistent epithelial defects (PED).

Methods : Patients with recalcitrant DES/PED were instructed to clean a finger, prick with a blood lancet, and apply a drop of blood to the lower fornix of the affected eye(s), 4 times daily for 8 weeks. Follow-up visits occurred 4 days, 2, 4, 8 weeks into therapy, and 4 weeks post-cessation. At each visit, visual acuity, corneal staining, Schirmer’s test, tear break-up time (TBUT), and ocular comfort index (OCI) were measured, and photographs taken. Results were analysed using Student’s paired t-test.

Results : 8 DES patients (14 eyes) were recruited. At 8 weeks, there was improvement in mean visual acuity (logMAR 0.28 to 0.18 (p=0.02)), Oxford corneal staining grade (3.46 to 2.18 (p=0.006)), and OCI score (57.86 to 32.33 (p=0.02)). Schirmer’s and TBUT improved, without statistical significance. 4 weeks post-cessation, mean acuity, staining grade and OCI worsened. 2 PED patients showed resolution after 1 month. No complications were seen.

Conclusions : In our limited case series FAB appears to be a safe and effective treatment for DES secondary to SS and PED.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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