September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Cell adhesion and protein adsorption studies of 3D printed photopolymers
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard M H Lee
    National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
    UCL School of Pharmacy, London, United Kingdom
  • Maryam Alband
    UCL School of Pharmacy, London, United Kingdom
  • Matthew Penny
    UCL School of Pharmacy, London, United Kingdom
  • Stephen T Hilton
    UCL School of Pharmacy, London, United Kingdom
  • Steve Brocchini
    National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
    UCL School of Pharmacy, London, United Kingdom
  • Peng Tee Khaw
    National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Centre at Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Richard Lee, None; Maryam Alband, None; Matthew Penny, None; Stephen Hilton, None; Steve Brocchini, None; Peng Khaw, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 2923. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Richard M H Lee, Maryam Alband, Matthew Penny, Stephen T Hilton, Steve Brocchini, Peng Tee Khaw; Cell adhesion and protein adsorption studies of 3D printed photopolymers. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):2923.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : 3D printing technology has the potential to develop personalised ophthalmic devices or organs with improved cost effectiveness and productivity. Limited experimental data exists as to the biocompatibility response of 3D printed photopolymers. We performed cell adhesion and protein adsorption studies of 3D printed photopolymers and materials used in current ophthalmic devices (Silicone, Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)).

Methods : Poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) (Sigma, MO, USA) and proprietary photopolymer (‘Clear’ and ‘Flexible’ resin, FormLabs, MA, USA) sample discs (n=6, 5mm diameter) were developed using a high-resolution, desktop stereo-lithography (SLA) 3D printer (Form 1+, Formlabs). Materials used in current ophthalmic devices (Silicone, PTFE, PMMA) were punched out with similar dimensions to the 3D printed discs. Protein adsorption was quantified using fetal calf serum (Invitrogen, CA, USA) with a micro bicinchoninic acid (Micro BCA, ThermoFisher, MA, USA) protein assay kit and direct assessment of fluorescein-conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA, Sigma) adsorption. Discs were seeded with monocytes and incubated for 24 hours at 37oC. Quantification of cell metabolism and cytotoxicity were performed using Alamar Blue and Live/Dead (ThermoFisher) assay kits respectively. Readings were recorded using a plate reader (Fluostar Optima, BMG Labtech, Buckinghamshire, UK). Data were compared using a two-tailed unpaired t-Test.

Results : 3D printed photopolymers demonstrated similar cell adhesion and protein adsorption compared to materials used in current ophthalmic devices. There were no statistically significant differences in measurements observed between 3D printed materials (P>0.05).

Conclusions : 3D printed photopolymer material demonstrated a similar biocompatibility response to currently used materials and may allow for the development of customisable ophthalmic devices or organs.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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