September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Perceptual training significantly improves visual functions in children with amblyopia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ge Chen
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Beijing, Beijing, China
  • Lejin Wang
    Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing, China
  • Fang Hou
    Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Zhong-Lin Lu
    Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Chang-Bing Huang
    Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Psychology, Beijing, Beijing, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ge Chen, None; Lejin Wang, None; Fang Hou, Beijing Juehua Medical Technology Co. (I); Zhong-Lin Lu, Adaptive Sensory Technology (P), Adaptive Sensory Technology (I); Chang-Bing Huang, Beijing Juehua Medical Technology Co (I)
  • Footnotes
    Support  This research was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the National Eye Institute (EY021553).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 3082. doi:
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      Ge Chen, Lejin Wang, Fang Hou, Zhong-Lin Lu, Chang-Bing Huang; Perceptual training significantly improves visual functions in children with amblyopia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):3082.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Although numerous studies have shown that perceptual learning can improve deficient visual functions in adults with amblyopia, the efficacy of perceptual learning in treating children with amblyopia has rarely been investigated. Here, we designed a child-friendly, individualized adaptive vision training (iAVT) based on a visual training procedure originally developed to train adults with amblyopia (Zhou, et al, 2006) to evaluate effects of perceptual learning in children with amblyopia.

Methods : Ninteen amblyopic children (7.78±2.73 yrs) were trained with the iAVT in a filtered letter E orientation identification task near their individual cutoff frequency for 8 sessions, with 300 trials or 30 minutes per session. Contrast sensitivity function (CSF) and visual acuity in both the amblyopic and fellow eyes, and stereo acuity were assessed before and after training. CSF was measured using the qCSF procedure (Lesmes, et al 2010). Each qCSF assessment took less than five minutes.

Results : Training significantly improved visual acuity (2 lines) and contrast sensitivity (53.9%, from 13.01 to 20.02, p< 0.0001) in the amblyopic eye, stereo acuity (80.8%, from 606’’ to 116.2’’, p< 0.0001), and contrast sensitivity (24.7%, from 28.4 to 35.4, p< 0.01) in the fellow eye. The magnitudes of improvements were correlated with pre-training visual deficits: The worse the pre-training measure was, the greater the improvements. Interestingly, we found no significant correlation among the magnitudes of improvements in visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and stereo acuity (all p > 0.39).

Conclusions : These results demonstrate the merit of perceptual learning in treating children with amblyopia. Consistent with results in adults with amblyopia (Xi, et al 2014), the lack of correlation among improvements in visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and stereo acuity suggests that structured monocular and binocular treatments are necessary to fully restore deficient visual functions in amblyopia.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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