September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Lipidomic and Proteomic Characterization of Subretinal Fluid in Coats Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa May Lagrou
    Kellogg Eye Center/Ophthalmology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Mercy D Pawar
    Kellogg Eye Center/Ophthalmology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Antonio Capone, Jr.
    Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan, United States
  • Michael Thomas Trese
    Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, Michigan, United States
  • Cagri G Besirli
    Kellogg Eye Center/Ophthalmology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Lisa Lagrou, None; Mercy Pawar, None; Antonio Capone, Jr., None; Michael Trese, None; Cagri Besirli, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Career Development Award, Research to Prevent Blindness (CGB); National Eye Institute, NEI-1-K08-EY-023982-01 (CGB); Core Center for Vision Research funded by P30 EY007003 from the National Eye Institute
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 3185. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Lisa May Lagrou, Mercy D Pawar, Antonio Capone, Jr., Michael Thomas Trese, Cagri G Besirli; Lipidomic and Proteomic Characterization of Subretinal Fluid in Coats Disease. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):3185.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To characterize the lipidomic and proteomic profile of subretinal exudate in advanced Coats Disease.

Methods : Subretinal fluid and plasma samples were collected at the time of vitreoretinal surgery for exudative retinal detachment from Coats disease patients. Subretinal fluid and plasma from patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment were used as control for comparison. Un-targeted shotgun lipidomics and proteomics assays were performed using high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the lipid and protein profile of the subretinal exudates. Lipidomic analysis was also performed for plasma samples. Lipidomic profiles of subretinal fluid were compared to plasma samples for each patient as well as subretinal fluid isolated from control patients. Proteomic profile of subretinal exudate isolated from Coats patients were compared to control subretinal fluid.

Results : Subretinal fluid of Coats disease had a unique lipidomic profile compared to control samples. The lipidomic analysis in patients with Coats disease revealed selective increases in the levels of phosphatidylcholines (PCs), triglycerides (TGs), sphingomyelines (SMs), and phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs). There was a 5 fold increase in 212 cationic lipids including lipids classed as TGs, SMs, and lyso-PCs and a 50 fold increase in 47 lipids, including lipids from TG, SMs, and lyso-PCs. There was a 50 fold increase in 4 anionic lipid classes in the Coats disease samples, including free fatty acids (FFA), lyso-PE and PC2 classes and a 5 fold increase in 49 anionic lipid classes. Proteomic analysis of the subretinal fluid in Coats disease identified 597 unique proteins.

Conclusions : We have characterized the lipidomic and proteomic profile of subretinal exudate associated with Coats disease. Our findings demonstrate that subretinal exudates in patients with Coats disease have a unique lipid signature. We successfully enriched and identified 597 proteins in the subretinal fluid in our proteomic analysis, including many low abundant proteins. Understanding the lipid and protein profile of subretinal exudate will identify novel pathways critical in the pathogenesis of Coats disease.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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