September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Looking for the best retinoblastoma mouse model using in vivo spectral domain optical coherence imaging
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie Lemaitre
    CMIB : Chemistry, Modelling and Imaging for Biology, Institut Curie, ORSAY, France
    Université Paris Descartes, PARIS, France
  • Florent Poyer
    CMIB : Chemistry, Modelling and Imaging for Biology, Institut Curie, ORSAY, France
  • Nathalie Cassoux
    Ophtalmology oncology, Institut Curie, Paris, France
    Université Paris Descartes, PARIS, France
  • François Doz
    Pediatric Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris, France
  • Laurence Desjardins
    Ophtalmology oncology, Institut Curie, Paris, France
  • Paul Freneaux
    Biopathology, Institut Curie, Paris, France
  • Carole Thomas
    CMIB : Chemistry, Modelling and Imaging for Biology, Institut Curie, ORSAY, France
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Stephanie Lemaitre, None; Florent Poyer, None; Nathalie Cassoux, None; François Doz, None; Laurence Desjardins, None; Paul Freneaux, None; Carole Thomas, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 3665. doi:
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      Stephanie Lemaitre, Florent Poyer, Nathalie Cassoux, François Doz, Laurence Desjardins, Paul Freneaux, Carole Thomas; Looking for the best retinoblastoma mouse model using in vivo spectral domain optical coherence imaging. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):3665.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular tumor in children. Current therapies have many adverse effects. New approaches must therefore be developed and evaluated on animal models. Retinoblastoma mouse models include transgenic mice and patient-derived xenografts. We report our experience with orthotopic xenograft models of retinoblastoma using different strains of mice.

Methods : Human retinoblastoma tumors were established and maintained by xenografted cells from enucleated eyes on immunodeficient mice. The orthotopic model was obtained by subretinal injection of cells in suspension in the right eye of immunodeficient (Swiss nude, SCID) and immunocompetent mice (C57BL6N, B6ALB). The follow-up of tumor growth was monitored in vivo by spectral domain optical coherence imaging (SD-OCT) imaging. Histology was also performed at the end of the follow-up.

Results : Retinal, subretinal and vitreal tumor growth were achieved in four different strains. Tumor growth was observed both in immunocompetent and in immunodeficient mice. Chronic retinal detachment may occur after the subretinal injection and it is more frequent in nude mice. SD-OCT imaging and histology show that retinal anatomy (thickness and number of layers) is different in nude mice.

Conclusions : Mouse strains include immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice, albino and pigmented mice. Retina is thinner in nude mice compared to other strains. This may be responsible for frequent chronic retinal detachment after the subretinal injection. The genetic background of a given mouse does not seem to influence the establishment of a retinoblastoma xenograft model. This approach will be evaluated using other intraocular tumors like choroidal melanoma.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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