September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Greater eye movement disconjugacy with near fixation in amblyopia during binocular viewing is associated with increased microsaccade rate
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Howard S Ying
    Ophthal & Visual Sciences, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Soolienah Rhiu
    Ophthalmology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hwaseong, Korea (the Republic of)
    Ophthal & Visual Sciences, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Connie Yang
    Ophthal & Visual Sciences, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Vivian Xu
    Ophthalmology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Robert Geary
    Ophthalmology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Boris I Gramatikov
    Ophthalmology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • David L Guyton
    Ophthalmology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Kristina Irsch
    Ophthalmology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Howard Ying, Johns Hopkins University (P), Lutronics, Inc. (C), REBIScan, Inc. (C), SPOUSE - Takeda, Inc. (E); Soolienah Rhiu, None; Connie Yang, None; Vivian Xu, None; Robert Geary, Johns Hopkins University (P); Boris Gramatikov, Johns Hopkins University (P); David Guyton, Johns Hopkins University (P); Kristina Irsch, Johns Hopkins University (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  EY19347, William Cross Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, No Pagination Specified. doi:
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      Howard S Ying, Soolienah Rhiu, Connie Yang, Vivian Xu, Robert Geary, Boris I Gramatikov, David L Guyton, Kristina Irsch; Greater eye movement disconjugacy with near fixation in amblyopia during binocular viewing is associated with increased microsaccade rate. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 201657(12):.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To determine whether increased eye movement disconjugacy with near fixation in amblyopic subjects during binocular viewing is associated with changes in microsaccade parameters.

Methods : Binocular eye movements were recorded at 500 Hz using the EyeLink 1000 eye tracker (SR Research Ltd., Ontario, Canada). Eleven amblyopic subjects, age 8-45 years, were asked to fixate on a blue cross subtending 0.5° at a near distance of 57 cm or at a far distance of 4 m for 20-second epochs of binocular or monocular viewing. Microsaccade number, duration, peak velocity, direction, binocularity, and reversals of direction (square-wave jerk configuration) were recorded. Means and standard deviations were calculated, and significance testing was performed with the Student’s t-test.

Results : Amblyopic subjects during binocular viewing showed more microsaccades with near fixation (1.4±0.1 microsaccades/s) than with far fixation and (1.9±0.2 microsaccades/s; P=0.02) and fewer reversals in direction with near fixation than with far fixation (49±22 % near vs. 58±16 % far; P=0.01). Both viewing conditions showed similar microsaccade duration (95±200 ms vs. 66±83 ms) and peak velocity (42±28 deg/s vs. 37±18.5 deg/s).

Conclusions : Increased disconjugacy with near fixational eye movements for amblyopic subjects during binocular viewing is associated with an increase in the number of microsaccades in the same direction. This increase in microsaccade rate with near fixation may indicate subclinical manifest latent nystagmus possibly from increased suppression of the amblyopic eye during accommodation to the near target.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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