September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Ganglion Cell Complex Thickness Distributions Measured with 3D OCT-1 Maestro in Normal Eyes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Qi Yang
    Topcon Advanced Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Topcon Medical Systems, Oakland, New Jersey, United States
  • Ying Dong
    Topcon Advanced Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Topcon Medical Systems, Oakland, New Jersey, United States
  • Wei Chieh Huang
    Topcon Advanced Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Topcon Medical Systems, Oakland, New Jersey, United States
  • Danny Leung
    Topcon Advanced Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Topcon Medical Systems, Oakland, New Jersey, United States
  • Charles A Reisman
    Topcon Advanced Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Topcon Medical Systems, Oakland, New Jersey, United States
  • Kinpui Chan
    Topcon Advanced Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Topcon Medical Systems, Oakland, New Jersey, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Qi Yang, Topcon Medical Systems (E); Ying Dong, Topcon Medical Systems (E); Wei Chieh Huang, Topcon Medical Systems (E); Danny Leung, Topcon Medical Systems (E); Charles Reisman, Topcon Medical Systems (E); Kinpui Chan, Topcon Medical Systems (E)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 4225. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Qi Yang, Ying Dong, Wei Chieh Huang, Danny Leung, Charles A Reisman, Kinpui Chan; Ganglion Cell Complex Thickness Distributions Measured with 3D OCT-1 Maestro in Normal Eyes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):4225.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To provide ganglion cell layer plus inner plexiform layer (GCL+) and ganglion cell complex (GCL++) thickness distributions and reference limits measured with 3D OCT-1 Maestro in normal eyes.

Methods : 399 normal subjects’ data were collected across seven clinical sites within the United States. One eye of each subject at random was imaged in both the 12x9mm2 wide and 6x6mm2 macular fixation three-dimensional scan modes with the 3D OCT-1 Maestro (Topcon, Tokyo, Japan). Data acceptance was based on clinical criteria, including blinks, eye motion, clipping, feature centration, segmentation errors, local weak signal, and image quality. Accepted data sets were automatically analyzed using version 8.27 software. Manual adjustments by the clinical sites were allowed. Both GCL+ and GCL++ thickness measurements were analyzed in the Macula6 grid with six sectors and overall average results. Descriptive statistics and the 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for each sector. 1st, 5th, 50th, 95th, and 99th percentiles were estimated by a simultaneous estimation of 99 non-crossing quantile regressions (Bondell et al. 2010) with age as covariate.

Results : For the wide scan mode, average GCL+ thickness was 71.4±5.9µm with the superior nasal sector having the largest average value of 74.5 ±6.6µm and the inferior sector having the smallest value of 67.3 ±5.9µm. The 95% CI for average GCL+ thickness was [70.8µm, 71.9µm]. Meanwhile, average GCL++ thickness was 105.9±8.5µm with the inferior nasal sector having the largest average value of 117.4 ±11.0µm and the superior temporal sector having the smallest value of 93.8 ±7.3µm. The 95% CI for average GCL++ thickness was [105.1µm, 106.8µm]. The regression lines for the 1st, 5th, 50th ,95th, and 99th percentile reference limits of the GCL+ and GCL++ show the trend of thickness decreasing with age in all sectors except the GCL++ inferior temporal sector 99th percentile reference limit . The 12x9 wide and 6x6 macula scan modes show similar results and trends overall.

Conclusions : The GCL+ and GCL++ thickness measurements with 3D OCT-1 Maestro on nearly 400 normal eyes provide a reference thickness distribution, and the reference limits at the 1st, 5th, 95th, and 99th percentile points may possibly aid in the diagnosis of ocular diseases in the adult population. Reference: Bondell, HD et. al. (2010). Biometrika 97, 825-838.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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