September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Preventive effects of green tea catechins on UV-induced cytotoxicity in human corneal epithelium cells
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • AKIKO TOJU
    Phamacology, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan
    Ophthalmology, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Yuko Udaka
    Phamacology, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Mayumi Tsuji
    Phamacology, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Junichiro Kizaki
    Phamacology, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan
    Ophthalmology, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Akiko Sasaki
    Phamacology, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Katsuji Oguchi
    Phamacology, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   AKIKO TOJU, None; Yuko Udaka, None; Mayumi Tsuji, None; Junichiro Kizaki, None; Akiko Sasaki, None; Katsuji Oguchi, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  non
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 4372. doi:
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      AKIKO TOJU, Yuko Udaka, Mayumi Tsuji, Junichiro Kizaki, Akiko Sasaki, Katsuji Oguchi; Preventive effects of green tea catechins on UV-induced cytotoxicity in human corneal epithelium cells. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):4372.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The keratoconjunctiva of the ocular surface is directly irradiated with solar ultraviolet light (UV) and exposed to many stresses compared with organ tissue. Accordingly, various UV-induced diseases affecting keratoconjunctiva, such as cataracts and photokeratitis have been based on epidemiological data. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades have been speculated as one of the mechanisms of UV-induced cytotoxicity.
Recently, it have reported that the tea catechin ,especially, (-)-Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) and (-)-Epigallocatechin 3-(3”-O-Methyl) Gallate (EGCG 3"Me) have numerous bioactivity, for example, anti-allergy, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammation, and anticancer activity. Furthermore, recent study showed that treatment with EGCG prevented the increment of apoptotic cells in dry eye corneas. To elucidate the protective effects of catechin on the UV-induced cytotoxicity in cultured human corneal epithelium (HCE-T) cells, we determined utilizing we examined a role of MAPK in protective effects of EGCG and EGCG 3"M on UV-induced cytotoxicity in the HCE-T cells.

Methods : We cultivated HCE-T (the SV40-immnortalized human corneal epithelial cell line; RCB No.2280) cells in (DMEM:HamF12=1:1)+ 5%FBS+ 5mg/ml Insulin+ 10ng/ml Human epidermal growth factor+ 0.5%DMSO+ 1%penicillin streptomycin in 5% CO2, 37 celsius environment. HCE-T irradiated UV (312nm, 4.94 mW/cm2, 296 mJ/cm2). HCE-T cells were treated with catechins for 1 hr before UV radiation. After UV exposure, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptotic rate and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity were determined.

Results : The increment of ROS production, apoptotic cells, and MAPK activity by UV exposure was prevented by treatment with catechins. These EGCG-mediated cellular events were effectively blocked by MAPK inhibitors.

Conclusions : These results suggest that EGCG might attenuate UV-induced cytotoxicity through the inhibition of the MAPK-signaling. EGCG may be protective agent against UV-induced cytotoxicity in HCE-T cells.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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