September 2016
Volume 57, Issue 12
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   September 2016
Refractive error and susceptibility to myopia in mice are inherited as quantitative trait
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrei V Tkatchenko
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
    Pathology & Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
  • David T Burke
    Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Tatiana V Tkatchenko
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Andrei Tkatchenko, None; David Burke, None; Tatiana Tkatchenko, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH grant R01EY023839
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 2016, Vol.57, 4836. doi:
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      Andrei V Tkatchenko, David T Burke, Tatiana V Tkatchenko; Refractive error and susceptibility to myopia in mice are inherited as quantitative trait. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2016;57(12):4836.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Refractive eye development is controlled by both environmental and genetic factors. However, contribution of genetic factors accounts for at least 70% of variance in refraction in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine whether genetic background influences refractive eye development and susceptibility to experimental myopia in mice.

Methods : Using a high-resolution automated eccentric infrared photorefractor, normal refractive eye development and susceptibility to form-deprivation myopia was compared in 11 genetically distant mouse strains, i.e., A/J, C57BL/6J, C57L/J, CAST/EiJ, CE/J, CZECHII/EiJ, NOD/ShiLtJ, NZO/HILtJ, PWK/PhJ, WSB/EiJ, and 129S1/svlmj.

Results : We measured refractive errors in 11 inbred mouse strains. We found that C57BL/6J and A/J mice are essentially emmetropic (+0.3 ± 0.6 D and -0.3 ± 1.5 D respectively). CAST/EiJ, CZECHII/EiJ, NOD/ShiLtJ, NZO/HILtJ, PWK/PhJ, and WSB/EiJ mice exhibited various degrees of hyperopia ranging from +5.8±2.1 D to +36±3.9 D, whereas C57L/J, CE/J, and 129S1/svlmj mice developed various degrees of myopia ranging from -5.3±2.1 D to -21.2±3.9 D. The differences in refractive errors between these strains of mice were statistically significant as revealed by ANOVA (F(10,173) = 507, P < 0.0001) and distribution of refractive errors was continuous. Analysis of the susceptibility to form-deprivation myopia in these 11 mouse strains revealed that genetic background strongly influenced the extent of myopia induced by visual form deprivation. The myopic shift in refraction in the deprived eyes (compared to the control eyes) ranged from -3.8 ± 1.6 D to -14.9 ± 3.1 D and represented a continuous distribution.

Conclusions : Thus, genetic background modulates refractive eye development and susceptibility to experimental myopia in mice. We have identified 11 genetically distant mouse strains with strikingly different refractive eye development and significantly different susceptibility to experimentally induced myopia. Our data suggest that refractive state of the eye and susceptibility to myopia in mice represent quantitative traits.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2016 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Seattle, Wash., May 1-5, 2016.

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